Wednesday, March 3, 2021

Haley Reading (Group 2) Nafissa Thompson-Spires's "Fatima, the Biloquist"

[Haley Reading groups Spring 2021

By Lakenzie Walls and Howard Rambsy II

In Nafissa Thompson-Spires's story “Fatima, the Biloquist: A Transformation Story” a teenage Black girl questions her identity and sense of self while attending a predominantly white school. She struggles to feel black enough and befriends Violet, a black teenager with albinism. Violet provides Fatima with guidance—teaching her different connotations and phrases with secondary Black-inflected meanings.

In one example, Fatima considers the racial implications associated with her brown top lip and pink lower one. At school around white people, “she talked with her pink lip, and with Violet, she talked with her brown one” (75). Fatima’s observations about navigating different environments as a Black girl persist throughout the story.

Identify what you thought of as an important scene from the story about the challenges awaiting a Black girl who “felt ready to become black, full black,” which is to say, a Black girl who embraces aspects of African American culture in more deliberate ways. 

Then, answer this question: how did the scene you identified confirm or alter your views concerning what a Black girl might face? Please provide the page number for the scene you identify.

48 comments:

Marianne Huck said...

One scene that I took away was the scene involving Rolf and Fatima where Rolf told her he was “colorblind”(80) and it wasn’t like she was “black black”(80). As a black girl fully coming to terms with being black and embracing it, it’s so painful when you see those close to you degrade those aspects of you. Like you have to be an “acceptable” black person in order to be respected and treated like another human being. You have to start confronting those who you though we’re your friends but have realized they only keep you around as their “token black friend”. Who gets to determine whats “ghetto” and why is embracing our culture “ratchet”?

This scene confirmed my views. I grew up as one of 6 black kids in my private school. I was adopted by whites parents and only had white friends. It’s suffocating and isolating. Something always feels missing inside of you.

Tatiana D. said...

One scene that stuck with me regarding Fatima's transition is when she explains to Violet how both she and her school are awkward (73) when Violet asks more about it. Fatima recognizes the challenges that come with appearing more "black", and that her actions in attempting to do this do not come as easy for her as some others. This scene confirmed my views concerning what a Black girl may face, considering a large amount of pressure is being applied on her to act, appear, and carry herself in a certain manner, simply because of her race.

Kayla Person said...

A scene I thought was important was on page 68 when Violet told Fatima, “You’re, like, totally a white girl, aren’t you?” This scene confirmed my views because I experienced it. Growing up, I was always told from my own people that I acted like a “white girl”. This always made me upset, but I have since learned that there is no set way to be a black girl.

-Kayla P.

Lesley S. said...

A scene that stood out to me the most stems from when Violet said to Fatima: "You're, like, totally a white girl" (68). The next paragraph states that "Fatima had been accused of whiteness and being a traitor to the race before..." (68). Trying to incorporate yourself into a part of a culture that calls you "whitewashed" is quite hard, specially when that's the only thing you grew up around as an example. And embracing being black comes with challenges. For example, people trying to decide how "black" you are. Like, what is up with that?

This stood out the most to me since I have experienced this situation. One day, my brother told me that I needed more "black" in my life. I took offense to that because I didn't choose to move to a neighborhood that was predominantly white nor did I choose to go to a school that was mostly composed of white students. If I did act more "black," I would get judged by my peers and get called "ghetto." So, it's pretty much like a lose-lose situation no matter what happens. I never realized that being black meant you had to act a certain way.

Maurice King said...

A scene I have identified that was important was on page 68 when Violet told Fatima that "You're, like, totally a white girl, aren't you"? This is just rude to say to someone since it basically degrading Fatima saying she is not recognized as being black at all. It had confirmed my views since some of my friends have been called that and it would cause them to be depressed for times.

Paris S. said...

A scene that stood out to me was on page 80, when Rolf told Fatima "Anyway, it's not like you're black black". This scene really displayed how in society a black girl is often looked down upon and disrespected by others. In society, a black girl is only respected if they are the "acceptable" or "less-threatening" black girl.

This scene confirmed my views of what a black girl may face in society. It's upsetting to see how society views us black women and would only respect us if we have "acceptable" qualities.

Jania Garrison said...

A scene that stood out to me was when Fatima asked Rolf if this was his first black girlfriend and he said he didn't see color and that she wasn't "black black"(80). The comment that he made made me feel like he was disregarding Fatima's culture. She had already been struggling with her identity and hearing her boyfriend say that he didn't see color probably felt like slap in the face. This scene confirmed my views on what black girls faced on a daily basis, especially ones who struggle with their identity.

Arielle S. said...

The scene that stuck out to me the most about challenges faced by a black woman aspiring to be "Black Black" was when Fatima, with Rolf and Violet, with Mike spot each other in the Cinema on pages 80-81. Fatima wanted to avoid Violet all together I assume because she did not know how the conversation would turn out, which she had every right to think considering how it actually went. When Fatima began trying to explain herself for Rolf knowing about "Patti Mayonaise" the story says her voice was all over and she had begun ventriloquizing.
this is significant because even myself coming from a similar background as Fatima (wealthy and proper with private schooling before college) but dark-skinned, I tend to ventriloquize or "code-switch" as we call it. This is a problem in the real world because sometimes you forget your surroundings and are in the wrong code (or lip as the book says) for your surroundings. this was a problem for Fatima because she was in front of both, Rolf with which she spoke using one "lip," and Violet, with which she used the other "lip" and. she was all over the place.

~Arielle S.

Mya Jackson said...

A scene that stood out to me was when Fatima and Violet were talking on page 68 and Violet questioned Fatima about her being black because she thought she was white. This displays the way black women are treated in society. If we are successful or we do not act how society wants us to, then we are not black. These characteristics makes us seem more acceptable because we don't fit under the description that society has created for black women. This scene was very disrespectful because Violet is failing to recognize Fatima for who she is. She wants to recognize Fatima as white.

This scene confirmed the issues I have been battling my whole life. I grew up in a majority white community and attended school with 1% of students identifying with a race other than white. There were situations when people would say "You're not even black." or "You don't act black, so you're basically white." This happened especially in my early years of high school because I didn't have much of a voice. However, I now make sure I embrace my background and express who I am. I should not have to act a certain way to be considered black.

Janielle F. said...

A scene I think was important was when Rolf stated that he thinks “it’s great that you as a Black family are so successful.” Fatima knows what he said was wrong and that her parents are upset with what he said but she continued on as though nothing was said; even choosing to go see a movie with him.

I think this scene highlights how some Black women believe that they are forced to settle and, for lack of a better word, roll-over and take backhanded compliments and praises from non-Black suitors in order to receive some sort of love and attention. Some women would rather put up with nonsense in a relationship just to be able to say that they are in a relationship than be satisfied being single and, as a young Black woman myself, I see a lot of other Black women dealing with things like this.

Brighten B. said...

A scene that I thought was important was when Fatima and Violet were talking and Violet says, “You’re, like, totally a white girl” on page 68. This scene really stood out to me because as she is wanting to embrace her true self, she will be less likely to want to after being told that. This scene confirms my views concerning what a Black girl might face because not only did it take me a long time to fully embrace myself, but I completely understand these hardships on a personal level. Fully embracing yourself is a very hard thing to do and being talked to and like that will just make it even harder. The views of others directly affect how you embrace yourself and if you accept who you are.

Chaianna Curry said...

One scene that I think did a great job of showing the types of challenges a young black woman might have to face is on page 66, after Fatima almost hit Wally. She sat and thought about how Wally was praised for his "blackness" while she was criticized. Fatima said," It wasn't fair that Wally was praised, even mildly popular, for his FUBU shirts and Jordans with the tags still on them, yet she was called 'ghetto superstar' the one time she outlined her lips with dark pencil." As a young black woman, I already know that feeling of having everything from your fashion sense to your cornrows being labeled as ghetto or hood. It's especially hard when your whiter counterparts copy your looks,turn them into trends and get praised. I knew that was something Fatima would come across on her journey.
_Chai Curry

Tyler Bean-Catencamp said...

The scene I chose is on page 80, where Rolf states "Anyway, it's not like your black black". First, that's a terrible thing to say to anyone of color. Second, it highlights the challenges that Fatima is facing when she is trying to embrace black culture. I feel as though this statement would sting extra right after Rolf says "I don't see color". Rolf's statement on page 80 is also very much different from Violet's statement on page 68 calling Fatima white, due to the difference in skin color and culture.

Lexis Lewis said...

The scene that tells the challenges that a black girl has to embrace is, "there was something prettier about her now, too, and people seemed to see it before Fatima did,"(Thompson-Spires 75). Fatima faces problems with her self esteem, when everyone realizes the changes that Fatima has acquired while befriended Violet. The confidence that Fatima gained, was because of the opinions of everyone else. Fatima accepts the person "she is becoming" because the people that she interacts with everyday is noticing her.
The scene confirmed my views because a black girl will accept herself as long as the people around her accepts her as well. This feeling will make a person be depressed about who they are inside. The depression of not being accepted will make the girl feel like she is not enough.

Unknown said...

The scene that stuck with me the most is when Fatima would be ashamed to use AAVE around Rolf, "Yeah, that'd be cool." She almost left the "I" off the end of the word, but caught herself," (pg 77). From past experiences at PWI especially when it came to sports teams it became evident to me that some of the inappropriate jokes that were made towards me were made because people thought that I just wasn't "cultured" enough or didn't have as much access to my black card as someone that used AAVE hence Rolf being more than comfortable saying, "I think it's great that you as a black family are so successful," (pg 79) around Fatima's family and expecting no repercussions or seeing the stereotypes in his statement.

*Josy Kanyi*

Paige G. said...

Growing up in southern Texas I understood what Fatima means when she only has white friends and feels so conflicted and alone. On one hand I had the Hispanic culture that’s I embraced at home but in class I was the only brown kid there. When Fatima was told that she wasn’t “black black”(80) I was almost enraged. Too many times I have been told that I’m “too white to be black” or “too brown to be white.” Growing up multiracial has its own struggles and I never felt like I belonged. I guess seeing how Fatima handled her situation mad me look back and consider that maybe I should learn from her, not take comments like that as an insult or be afraid to be myself, but to embrace my color and my culture.

Jared Willis said...

The scene that stuck out the most to me was the conversation between Rolf and Fatima, on page 80, when Rolf says, "Anyway, it's not like you're black black." From a personal perspective, I can relate to this somewhat seeing as I am a biracial male. Growing up I was often told things like "Oh I didn't know you were mixed" or "You act really white for a mixed kid" and I know that I didn't enjoy it so I cannot imagine what others have to go through when thinking of things related to this.

-Jared Willis

Zaria Hankins said...

A scene that stood out to me was the scene where Fatima reflects on the difference between the predominantly white school’s reaction to her embracing the African American culture and the reaction to a white student embracing the African American culture. On page 66 the text reads “It wasn’t fair, Fatima thought, that Wally was praised, even mildly popular, for his FUBU shirts and Jordans with the tag still on them, yet Fatima was called ‘ghetto supastar’ the one time she outlined her lips with a dark pencil. Nor was it fair that she should get a warning from Principal Lee for ‘looking like she might become violent… ” This scene reveals that despite her peer’s fascination with the culture there are still preconceived stereotypes and judgments when a black girl such as Fatima embraces the culture. This scene displays the double standard that black girls have to face where their culture is accepted by their white counterparts or peers but they are not.
This scene confirmed my views concerning what a Black girl might face because it once again represented the struggle with identity that many black girls have to face at some point in their lives. It also reveals the pressure that is placed upon black girls to choose between embracing black culture or “being whitewashed and successful”.

Peyton Payne said...

One of the challenges i can see from embracing your culture as a black woman in her situation is that since she is around a white people who are applauding a white person saying the n word, that she could be treated especially bad and lose some of the "friends" she has. The blatant racism of the people around her is disgusting and could cause uneccessary problems for her in the future.

This scene supports my views because if people are already racist as it is, it could only get worse if she were embracing her culture, which is sad. scene on page 66

Anonymous said...

A scene that stuck out to me was the one on page 68 when Violet told Fatima “you’re, like, totally a white girl, aren’t you?” This stuck out to me because I’ve seen a lot of people say that someone who is black “acts white” and it is very disrespectful that people say those kinds of things people think that because you’re intelligent that you aren’t black. This scene confirmed my views because there are many black girls I know that are angry because everyone says that they act white and they feel like they’re too black for white people and too white for black people.

-Richard H.

Nijay Spellman said...

The scene on page 80 when Rolf tells Fatima that she is not "black black" stood out to me. This comment represents what black women go through on a daily basis because he is only fond of her and deals with her based on the standards of what an "acceptable black woman" is. This can be a struggle for someone who is trying to get in touch with the real them or their culture because they can feel as if it would be wrong or looked down upon.

Nijay Spellman

Alleson Huntspon said...

I identified with a couple scenes from these pages we read recently. I think the one that caught my attention the most was the one on 68 in regards to Fatima being labeled as a white girl. This often happens to black girls like myself, a younger black girl with a stem major isn’t commonly seen among our race as much as it Is in others so often I hear the same types of things. This scene didn’t alter my views I just feel like it’s a never ending cycle black girls who obtain interest in white dominated fields I feel will always hear things like this. -Alleson H

Jalen White said...

I think about the part where Fatims was told that she was not "black black". It is a line that is far too common thing, and it hit me hard when I read it. Her identity had been in question already, and that must've felt like a blow to her path to discovering herself. I feel like the scene is just a representation to what black women must face during adolescence, and it must be a tough ordeal.

Ta'mya Cummings said...

The scene that stuck out most to me was on page 80 when Rolf stated, "Anyway, it's not like you're black black". That's like saying he wouldn't date her if she came off as "fully black". In my opinion it's like putting a bandaid on a stab wound. He's criticizing her in a "less harsh way", but in reality its hurting her more because she already don't want to be viewed as too white. This scene confirmed my views on what a black girl can face because women be judged all the time and it seems as if it don't fit the standard of the person from the outside then something is wrong.

Kiya R. said...

A scene that I thought was particularly important in regards to the challenges a Black girl goes through when she fully embraces her culture was on page 70. The narrator states, "In fact most interactions were easier with Violet than they were with others. Violet understood things. Fatima never had to explain why she might wrap her hair in a silk scarf at bedtime or why she always carries a tube of hand cream to prevent not only chapped hands, but also allover ashiness" (70). This highlights how Black girls are always expected to explain themselves or the cultural things that they do because society has never tried to embrace us our culture, so we always feel isolated unless we are with someone else who understands us and embraces our culture as well.

This confirmed my views on what a Black girl faces in society because I have been in similar situations where I felt annoyed or isolated because someone treated me differently or tried to force me to explain the cultural things that I do.

Carah F. said...

In the scene where Rolf came over for dinner, he said, “‘I think its great that you as a black family are so successful.’” (pg. 79) Then he later he claimed to be color blind and told Fatima, “‘…it’s not like you’re black black’” (pg. 80) I have been in this exact situation. Black girls are always fighting for validation from their communities, and he just kind of wrote off that validation with a careless statement. Fatima spent all this time getting know Violet and her perspective of black culture. Then she just throws it away for an ignorant boy who doesn’t realize the underlying prejudice tones of his comments. Fatima shouldn’t have to pick her “white side” over her “black side”. However, she does need to realize who her real friends are and stop seeking validation from people who don’t even notice her until its convenient.

Anonymous said...

One scene that confirmed what black girls face was on page 68 where Violet said "You're, like, totally a white girl, aren't you?" to Fatima. This really stung me deeply because I have been told this by numerous people in my life. I attended a predominantly white high school and this comment was made towards me by people from every race and including members of my own family. My name is also Fatima so reading that felt like a direct blow towards me. What seems like an innocent comment can hurt more than expected so this just demonstrates why people should be more careful with their words.

-Fatima Bashir

Ilysa Walker said...

The scene that stuck out to me is something I have been accused of myself. Being "accused of whiteness and being a traitor to the race..." is not an accusation any person should be subjected it. Our society filtered to only mean evil when you compare someone else to another race. It is liking pulling an arm and leg for society to rise other races up. It is blasphemous and disrespectful to strip someone of something they were born to.

Tymia Sleet said...

I find the scene that stood out and confirmed the things that black girls have to face is when Fatima is asked by violet, "you're like totally a white girl aren't you?" and I think this is so important because black girls are often told they have to talk a certain way, act a certain way or look a certain way in order to be black when in reality none of that takes away from your blackness or your culture. I have been in situations where I feel like I wasn't "black enough" but I had to learn that me being black is apart of who I am and nothing I can do will change that.

K Carter said...

A scene that stuck out to me was on page 68 when Violet says, “You’re, like, totally a white girl." This moment in the story confirmed my beliefs about what us as black women face. I can relate because most of my life I have been in poorly divorced schools and when I come around other black women who have been predominately in a black community, I have heard comments like the one Violet made

KYLIE JACKSON said...

The scene that stuck with me was on page 68 when Violet told Fatima, "You're, like, totally a white girl, aren't you?" This is because it personally resonated with me. In school, people always told me that I "acted white" or "wasn't black enough" because of the way I spoke. I know now that this was blatant colorism of verbiage, but back then, it shuddered my sense of identity as a black girl--making me feel not truly myself or like I wasn't good enough to be myself. Now, I embrace my intellect AND the color of my skin as they are--one within another, connected, and what make me me.

Kylie Jackson

Deja L. said...

A scene that stood out to me was when Fatima was talking about her two toned lips and how she talks to her white friend with the pink lip and Violet with the brown lip. Code switching is definitely a required skill in the black community, but it can almost feel like you're hiding your identity to the point where you don't even know which one if the real you.
-Deja Lane

Walter Carroll said...

I thought it was important when Violet told Fatima, “You’re, like, totally a white girl, aren’t you?" (68). I thought this was important because I often hear from different people about how people also treat black folks differently when they act a color. For example, I've heard that people are more likely to get job interviews if they present themselves as more whitely.

-Walter Carroll

Cynthia Martin said...

One scene that stood out to me was on page 80 where Rolf told Fatima that she was not “black black”. It stood out to me that Fatima had to try to take it as a compliment because that shows how complicated it could be for her as she’s going through a cultural transformation but also wants to be acceptable to the people that surround her. I think that also is where she began to realize that she can’t simply keep her lips parted and expect them to not clash.

Anonymous said...

One scene that I thought was important was on page 80 when Rolf said, “Anyways, it’s not like you’re black black”. Hearing these words or anything similar as a black woman does hurt, and just confirms the view that black women don’t have it easy, and are constantly facing problems with being able to be themselves. Along with this scene, on page 66 when she was at school and her principal said, “looking like she might become violent”, I think this one is important as well in showing what a black woman goes through. Because no matter what we do we are deemed as angry or loud and if we try and act “proper” we aren’t “black black”, which is all a problem.

-Tiffany Ellison 3/5/21

Anonymous said...

A scene I have identified as important was page 68 ,this is when Violet told Fatima that "You're, like, totally a white girl, aren't you"? This comment was just very unnecessary. I feel like sometimes people word vomit and this is what Violet did when she told Fatima this. I also didn't like this comment because it's very anti black and degrading.

-Ashanti Young 3/5/21

Anonymous said...

Ebonie Byrd said...
On page (81) when Rolf states “Even your black friends are white” is identifiable with because there are these certain standards the world has for black women or they are supposed to appear a certain way. This causes black women to become boxed in , not allowing black women to choose their own identity.This creates limited space for black women to expand and grow because society views them as something else.Also I think it is ironic how the author reverse the roles of have a girl that appears white teaching the black girl how to be “black”

March 2, 2021 at 12:18 PM

Cheyenne Carpenter said...

One of the scenes that stuck out most to me was on page 80 when Rolf told Fatima "It's not like you're black black anyways." This scene confirmed my views as to what a Black girl might face because it was like Rolf was completely ignoring her black side and that's exactly what happens in real life.

Thaira Mason said...

A scene that stood out to me was on page 72, "Violet broke down slang that had previously mystified Fatima". Then Violet followed with teaching her how bad things or words were turned into terms of endearment, like nigga and gangsta. It made me laugh a little because she also explained for sure and how black people say fisshow and the fact that we still say all of these things we funny to me.
-Thaira Mason

Anonymous said...

A scene that stood out to me was page 80 when Rolf said “Anyways it’s not like you’re black black” this stood out to me because black women in general always have to dull themselves in order to appear acceptable in society but in doing so their community can lose respect for them. If we speak out about something we feel strongly about we often are deemed “ghetto” or “ratchet” while if we don’t use AAVE we are deemed “not black enough” black women should be able to speak out about what they believe in and their true feelings without having to fit into any stereotypes

-Aalita Cole 3/9/21

Byron Coulter said...

Something that stuck out to me was something that was said on page 69. This is when the author said something about some cute boys going to try and talk to Fatima but then backing out and asking "You go to a private school don't you?" And because of the fact that she went to a private school and that was mostly white and the boys didn't, she couldn't make any friends that were the same ethnicity as her. This is a problem in real life because minorities in general and defined by struggles. Someone may get out of that struggle but as soon as they do they are ridiculed for it. Examples of things being said like "you sold out" or "you left us behind." People who are like this act like their peers are supposed to stay in the dirt and roll around with them forever and think its fine. But as soon as someone in the minority gets a little success its a bad thing.

Nyah Crockett said...

Something that really identified with me was on page 68 when Violet told Fatima, "You're, like, totally a white girl, aren't you?" As someone who was raised in a predominantly white neighborhood and went to a predominantly white school, when I spent time with black people my age, I would be told that I "acted white."

On the other side, my white friends would tell me I acted black. It was very hard for me to find my identity in the black community. Like Fatima in the story, I would try to learn slang to fit in but I felt like a faker because it was something that I had to teach myself instead of something that came naturally.

I've since grown from this and learned to embrace my black side, but I really struggled with it for a long time so Violet's comment to Fatima really brought up memories.

Avery Owusu-Asiedu said...

When Violet says to Fatima "You're like, totally a white girl, aren't you" (68) it shows what black women and black men have to face when they don't conform to stereotypes. This identity struggle is present in a lot of people, because you are told by black and white people that "You don't act black" as if acting black is something predetermined. She was just being herself, but even her friend was judging her and making it seem like she should alter her identity.

Avery Owusu-Asiedu

Alexis Short said...

one scene that stood out to me is on page 72 and I do not particularly understand why she thinks violet is a good teacher on learning about her origins of being African American. I think if Fatima really wants to know more about her culture and where she came from I think the only people who truly know and can be able to give her the right knowledge of it is her parents because like Fatima they are also black and have experience. With violet, she probably learns about African Americans through the news, television, etc.

As a mixed girl half black half white, I feel I can relate to Fatima in so many ways. I being mixed grew up in my mother's family who were predominately white so of course, being around white people will make it seem like you are exactly like one. My friends and people I know have told me you do not act black and they are more or less right about me but just because I do not act black does not mean I am not. It is honestly really hard to learn about African American culture especially with having no relation to my other side so I try to learn through my black friends or parents because I know they know more than my white mother or my white friends will know.

-Alexis Short

Anonymous said...

A scene that stood out to me personally was when Violet said Fatima was "...like, totally a white girl..." because this shows that despite her actual race, being a black female, Fatima was associated with "whiteness" because of her actions. This shows the categorization of certain characteristics, how being polite and well-spoken are deemed white while the opposite, being loud or uneducated, has been attributed to black culture and even to other minority cultures.
This portion especially confirmed my views concerning what a black girl might face, it shows that being yourself, no matter who you are, is never enough. You can be a loud person and you're deemed stereotypical, if you're a quiet or reserved person you're supposedly trying to be white. If you embrace your culture through hairstyle or clothing its ghetto or unprofessional, if you adopt more socially acceptable hairstyles, you're again trying to be white.
Being a mixed female, I especially know what this is like, being caught between two worlds that for whatever reason society will never allow to mix, it instates insecurity for many in just existing because we don't fit in. In many instances I am reminded that I am either too white or too black, not white enough or not black enough. In my everyday life I experience these struggles, even here in college. It is difficult but I find security in knowing that I am exactly who I am for a reason, I have friends and loved ones who care for and support me no matter the color of my skin. I am confident in that.

Kendall Fry 3/10/21

Anonymous said...

The page that made me really think about the plight of the black girl experience was page 80 when Rolf mentioned “colorblindness” I believe this is a cheap phrase to say when expressing feelings toward people of color. It erases the different tones and depths that make us who we are, especially when we are dealing with an albino girl who is black, but has no melanin in her skin. With colorblindness blinders on, what is her black plight to you? Probably nonexistent. This further proved to me the hardships and levels skin based prejudices have. The color of your skin plays so much into your identity as a person and how others perceive you.

Kaelyn Cupil, 3/21/21

Anonymous said...

The part that stood out the most for me in relation with what black girls/women face is on page 68 where violet says, "you are totally a white girl, aren't you?" I think that is really wrong color should not determine anyone's behavior. I believe in in the saying, "My name is my brand I should not be generalized.


-Elizabeth Kyande
3/25/21

Chantay Peoples said...

I was very hurt by rolf's words of " Any way, it's not like your black black." Being a black woman in America, I have heard this line from many people, mostly aimed at my lighter-toned friends. Today's society takes the stereotypical "strong black woman" and makes it an excuse to continue to kick us when we are down. If we aren't tough, we are seen as vulnerable and too fragile for this world. Our voices won't be heard, if we are headstrong then we are manipulative. Excuse my language but I have been called a "bitch" multiple times solely because I wouldn't allow people to talk to me in any type of way. The darker the skin of my sisters and I, the less we are desired unless we have, what is portrayed, a s white features. Small nose, big lip, have to have a supermodel physique or we get overlooked and under-loved.
Chantay Peoples