Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Between the World and Me (Reflections)



[Between the World and Me]

We've been covering Ta-Nehisi Coates's Between the World and Me for the last few weeks. What are some of your initial thoughts so far about the book? What, in particular, have you fund yourself thinking about the most from the first section? Why?


25 comments:

Rodrick Robins said...

Something that I've been thinking about is generational views of the world through the eyes of black males. I think it's interesting how Coates notes that his son views things differently than him since they were raised in different time periods, yet they still, sadly enough, have understanding about certain expressions of societal prejudice.

Bryce Barker said...

I have really enjoyed this book so far. I like that I am able to see how someone else views the world because we all have different views of the world, but never really get to talk about it to one another. One thing that has stuck with me is on pages 41-43 when Coates talks about how everyone on the college campus has the same ethical background, but live their lives in different ways. The reason this stuck with me is because it gives a great example of how someone can be of the same race, but it does not mean that they all live the same life style. It goes along with the saying, "don't judge a book by its cover" because you truly never know someone until you get to meet them and know more about them.

Jelani Brown said...

My initial thoughts on the book are rather interesting because where as Nehisi wants to shock the reader with racial slurs, it does not shock me. This is why I like the book; it truly defines how desensitized our generation has become. We seem to be looking from someone else's point of view, but when my view in the real world becomes a parallel to what Nehisi experienced, it just seems all too surreal. It just leaves me thinking on whether or not society will change to standard's of individuals rather than grouping people and giving them a complete standard.

Lawrence Payne said...

I have found the book surprisingly interesting. It brings different facts and views that people are mostly ignorant too. For instance, he brings up how America wasn't built on peaceful means.On page six he mentions how ice cream socials and wine tastings aren't a part of it,and it was acquired by, "... through the pillaging of life, liberty, labor and land;" He also mentions how people's preconceived notions won't always match reality like when he described Harvard's Yard. This book is very intriguing and I can't wait to finish it.

Joshua Jones said...

The book is very unique to me. When I read, I feel as though I am becoming more conscious of the world. My vocabulary increases and my critical thinking expands. I feel that the arguments made in this book are very real and African Americans should read it in their life time. I continue to think about how society works and where I stand in it.

-Joshua J.

Emmanuel Ogunbode said...

So far this book has been very interesting and informative as well. I find it interesting that there are different generations being looked at and how these generations change over time. Though generations change, they still have the same mindset which goes to show that there might not be a way to change the mindset of an entire group.

jingolder said...

The thing that I have found most notable from the reading so far is Coates' attitude towards America. He writes in a way that is illustrative of a person who is really conflicted about his feelings towards his country. Even though he is more explicit in describing the things that frustrate him about America, one can also see that he views America with appreciation and endearment. I feel like this symbolizes the feelings of most black Americans that are cognizant of the darker side of America's history.

Wole A said...

One of the things I enjoyed most about the book is being able to view the world through the eyes of another individual during a different period in time. I am able to view society from his perspective. Another main idea that stood out to me was the trends from generation to generation. Its not surprising to see that we are still facing the same issues.

Joey N. said...

Ta- Nehisi Coates publication "Between the World and Me" is as interesting as it is relatable. The author's description of the life of men and women of color is passionate and precise. The melody of self revelation has been played vividly throughout each page so far and the chorus of warning and unwavered optimism on behalf of the author is a refreshing twist to the act of racial storytelling.

Joey N.

Brian Green said...

This book has been very interesting thus far because of how Coates explains the way he grew up in his town. Also, the effects America and his surroundings has has on his life, and the actions he still takes today. This book gave me another insight on the how different cultures lived in America, and the approach they took. I believe that America had a great influence on Coates, and he speaks about what he thinks of living in America as a whole. The issues that he discusses in the book are clear cut, and he explains why he thinks that way. This provides us readers a chance to gain more knowledge that was not known before.

Jeremiah Blackburn said...

So far this is one of the most interesting books I have read in a while. Especially reading about some of the issues Coates had to deal with growing up, the issues he encountered were very different than the issues I dealt with in my childhood. I have also spend a fair amount of time contemplating the analogies he uses when he discusses us, as black people, losing our black body.

Keanu Rodriguez said...

So far, I have found the book very interesting in my opinion. The book has given me the opinion of an intelligent black male who has experienced life a little different from me based on his age and circumstance. This book has also given me more insight on things that I already knew occurred, however through a different perspective. "Race is the child of racism, not the father." This quote is the message in the book that holds the most in my mind. I can honestly say that I agree with this quote completely

Jamal Sims said...

The author Ta-nehisi Coates really has a way with words. The way he vividly makes his story come to life through a few sentences in a paragraph is, in my opinion, unprecedented. When coats elaborates on the streets and the school system being one of the same beast. "Fail in the streets and the crews would catch you slipping and take your body. Fail in the schools and you would be suspended and sent back to those same streets where they would take your body" (p32). It exposes yet another fault in the american education system. I would have never correlated the two together and that excerpt from the first part of the book really exposed me to something that I didn't previously give thought to. I believe he was right when he stated that black people weren't originally meant to be a part of the "American Dream" and it shows considering the lack of support black people have in the community and overall, in the United States.

Roland Wooters said...

I have really enjoyed this book thus far. I think that it brilliantly shows the transformation that occurs within a black man. It is so refreshing reading about a black man actually facing adversity, and not just being a statistic. I feel like I have had a similar journey as Coates, and that is the most interesting aspect to me.

Trion T. said...

This book was more captivating than I thought it would be and more relatable than about any other book I've ever read. How it talks about the way blacks are viewed now and how it was growing up in his neighborhood. I especially like when Coates talked about how he was treated by his editors when he was working for the newspaper. I was raised with a lot preconceived notions about other races that were quickly disproved when I moved from Chicago.

Xavier Morrison- Wallace said...

In the beginning, the book really touches up on real events that happened recently and in the past. Ta-Nehisi Coates analyzes and offers his own unique perspective like breaking down the phrase "government of the people" and emphasizing that "race is the child of racism, not the father." One part that I thought about the most was on page 11, last paragraph. Its just times like that were you see where the world and people's minds are still at. Also, sometimes people (especially young people) just need to see cases like that so they can figure it out without their hand being held so they can be more intelligent and stronger in the future.

Tre Reid said...

I just find myself thinking over and over again about the points he touches on. I know that's most of the book, but I've never read something that was so real world and so true. Everything he talks about it stuff we see everyday, and we might even think about the same thing. When he explains his thoughts however, it's just like he said what I knew I was thinking. I just didn't know how to put it into words. He not only makes you think about what's going on in our country but he gets personal, and his word choice makes the book really hit home and touch your heart.

-R. Reid

Robert F said...

I found the beginning of the book more interesting. I could relate better to what the author was writing about. The author seems to have experienced similar situations and he can relate to many of the readers point of view. Ta-Nehisi Coates expresses himself in a way that can be considered art, while remaining true to his readers.

Jessie Carter said...

Ta-Nehisi Coates tells a story that many people, including myself, can relate to. At the same time, he introduced a different way to look at things that i regularly wouldn't examine as deeply. He doesn't tell you what you already know about the people in your neighborhood or about the injustice we face in the world, he also teaches that everything isn't the way you think it is. I think that is most interesting to me while reading this book.

Barry F. said...

After reading the first section of "Between the World and Me", it has provoked some new thoughts for me. First of all, he is painting a vivid picture of how he is beating the odds regardless of the injustices that stand in the way. I like that the book is full of fresh ideas and new things I have never thought about. It makes me want to keep turning the page to see how his several stories continue on. I am excited to see what section 2 has in store.

De'Abrion Joyner said...

I've really liked reading the first section of this book. I think my biggest attraction is just how real and valid a lot of the things the author is talking about. A lot of things we read for certain classes have a watered down way of looking at situations that have happened and this isn't that. The author does a great job of emotionally attaching everyone to this book.

John Kriha said...

After reading the first section of "Between the Word and Me", what I enjoy most is how Coates gives us his own perspective as he touches on current racial events. This is one of the reasons why his book can relate to the current generation. I enjoy reading him address modern day issues of a long lasting injustice and how it helped shape and inspire him to write the book. As a reader I find it easy to put myself in his place as I am reading which helps me analyse his position on a deeper level.

Jonathan Pittman said...

At this point in the book we are about halfway done. I am enjoying this read immensely although I feel Coates hasn't said much we already don't know. I feel that its more of him writing down the unwritten rules of this country and our society. The first part of this novel only seemed to serve as a reminder that we are oppressed as a people. He does answer questions but saying that we were not a part of the american dream just prompts more questions. Despite this the book isn't over as of yet so maybe more answers are still in store.

Kaine C. said...

At this point with the book i enjoy how he gives us his perspective of the world around him. How he thinks and feels on subjects of racial events. What I find myself thinking about the most is his schooling. How if he messes up he goes back to the streets, how on one foot he has a chain from the street and on the other he has a chain from the school. He can't seem to get away.

Isaiah Blackburn said...

I’m on the fence about the book so far. I really enjoy some of the passages but there are others that I cannot relate to or understand that well. One thing that has stood for me is Coates’ recognition of the age difference between him and his son. So far it feels like Coates is just trying to explain how he evolved and leave his son to diffuse through the clues on his own and apply it to his life because they were raised in different environments.