Wednesday, April 27, 2016

The Warmth of Other Suns: Reflections




[The Warmth of Other Suns]
 
Ok readers, we've reached the end of Isabel Wilkerson's The Warmth of Other Suns. What's one idea that you found most memorable, challenging, or surprising concerning the book? Why?

66 comments:

Breanna B. said...

I really enjoyed the novel this semester. The one thing that really amazed me was the stories about how Gladney watched the youth disrespect their own selves. I find this to still be an issue in today's society. It's so easy for the oppressed minorities to fall into the pit that is the role they "believe" they must play in society. The book was wonderful and so enlightening. These are the kind of histories we should be teaching in schools. My view of the North vs. South treatment of African Americans has been greatly altered after reading the stories. It's easy to put forth the "good-guy vs bad-guy" theme when teaching in the classroom, but we should all know by now that things like this are not always so straightforward.

Shervonti N. said...

One of the most memorable things from the book for me involved the effect that the migration had on individuals mainly from the South but from the North and probably anywhere else in America. I'm sure we all know the history but I liked the approach this book had. Personal stories that gave real insight to the situations we've learned in our history books. It's crazy that our country was once so segregated... so segregated that the movement was called a "migration." These individuals moved from one place in their country to the next but were not seen as Americans where they came from. They fought for their title and rightful name.

Alexandra J said...

I liked being able to see the characters grow throughout their journeys and the individual challenges they faced as they arrived to the New World. Wilkerson invested so much time into this book and personal research. I found it incredible that she interviewed over 1,200 people, interviewed less than 50 for more in depth information and chose three of those stories to present to her readers. I found this entire book memorable regarding the overall content because so many of this information is untold. There are not many stories that depict individual circumstances in such a personal level.

Shardai J-H. said...

The idea I found most concerning was on page 536 where it mentions that "the Great Migration was an unrecognized immigration within this country. In classes the Great Migration is not a subject that is often taught. If it is, it is merely mentioned. The Great Migration is noteworthy in African-American history. Subjects like Black Wall Street in Oklahoma that was established and tragically ended in the beginning of the migration is never mentioned and goes unnoticed. We need knowledge of these things to take notice of how strong our people actually are outside of slavery.

gabriel said...

I liked how the stories seemed to flow. Isabel Wilkerson was able to talk about the difficulties these people went through at different times in the migration. As I read, I was able to connect situations in the story and what is occurring today. Wilkerson talked about the great migration, which was the relocation of African Americans from but 1915 to around the 1970s. Not a lot of people have reported on the migration. The move was necessary because African Americans wanted rights that they were not being given in the south. The common characteristics between the main characters were that they were patient and determined. The 3 characters ran into struggles in the south for example picking cotton, low wages, or not being able to practice. Even after the migration the characters found struggles in the north (or west) that they did not foresee. The character I like the most was Dr. Robert Foster because he was in the health care field. He ends up in California and that is where I want to end up as well.

- Gabriel Msengi

Jacqueline C. said...

The idea I found most interesting was actually a line that read, "The children need to learn early to make them have a brighter, less violent future (467)." I definitely agree with this statement because the youth is only getting worse and we need to teach them at young ages to do well and succeed to set examples for younger generations. There have been higher crime rates, murders, and violence in the world these past several years. It will only get worse if something is not done. Everybody speaks about change and helping young people do the right thing but there is very little action being done to make that step towards change. Many people are afraid to speak up because they fear backlash and negative opinions.This is necessary in order to save our future children from going down the wrong paths and creating better and stronger leaders.

Kellsey H said...

Subsequent to reading this book, I've had a reoccurring notion within my thoughts. I feel as though white individuals view African Americans as monsters. They are seen as existing outside of the norm. This, in my eyes, is disturbing; To view another member of society as abnormal because he or she is not similar to you in appearance. It is so disheartening that African Americans were and still are looked upon as individuals to be feared.

Aja J. said...

The most surprising thing I found while reading the book is the amount of people and time the author took to bring the book together. I think all the experiences in this book were unique to each individual, but shared a common story. A story of struggle and determination and that is a reason I adore this book so much.

Belainesh Nigeda said...

I think the most concerning thing about reading this book is that although we have made progress, I am still able to relate some of the situations discussed in the book to today. I loved reading the progress and growth of the characters in the book. To read about the struggles in the South and to read about the struggles they had even after moving to the North was very interesting to me. It was clear that the author was dedicated to telling an accurate, vivid and thorough story.

-B. Nigeda

Joey N. said...

The entity I found most memorable while reading this book was the description of Bill Russell's childhood. Bill Russell is one of the greatest basketball players of all time, and reading about his struggles on and off the court was immensely interesting.

JaLeah M . said...

The entire idea/concept of the novel along with the time and dedication Wilkerson put into the novel is very commendable. I think the most memorable quote is the one that reads, "Our negro problem therefore is not of the negro's making. No group in our population is less responsible for its existence. But every group is responsible for its continuance" this quote kind of casts a cloud of what one of the important themes/messages this book has, and this quote is illustrated throughout the novel.

Deborrah Blackburn said...

What I found most memorable about the book were the stories told by the characters about major events like Black Wall Street. It's very interesting hearing these things from people who actually lived it because you can see their first-hand experiences. I also think that it's very important to implement historical events, like the one in the book, into schol curriculums. One quote from the book stated, "The children need to learn early to make them have a brighter, less violent future (467)." I believe this to be completely true because without education and an example to follow, people will only become worse.
Deborrah B.

Mikaela S said...

One idea that I found most challenging was simply the fact of how black people were treated in those days. It truly amazes me that a person could find it in their heart to be so full of hate toward another person based solely on their skin color. While this is still an issue for some today, it warms my heart to know that the world is constantly changing, and while nothing will ever be perfect, we, as a country, have made great improvement since the time frame stated in the book.

Robert F said...

I really enjoyed all of the first-hand stories the author gave us. They were unfiltered and gave readers a better idea of what it was like to be black in the past. Whites typically viewed blacks as subhuman and that is unacceptable. It also enlightened me on how poorly blacks were treated in the north. There was so much enlightenment in this book, I feel like anyone who wants to experience black history with minimal filters, this book is definitely the way to do it. The author has so many stories from many interviews, so one story never gets too old before another is introduced.

Kiara G. said...

I really enjoyed this novel because it gave me a lot of insight on African American history. I liked how the experiences throughout the book were from the same people because I was able to really relate more to the author, and gave a more in depth view of how black people felt about the events that occurred during the 1900's, and how it effected their lives then, and all black people's lives now. The story that was told my Ida Mae about the bad acts that occur in Chicago was the most memorable for me because we hear the same stories told today on the news, and from people who live there now, and it is disheartening to read a book regarding black history and what our people went through in the past to make a better way for us all, but some of us still have yet to make it out.

Bryce Barker said...

The one thing I found most memorable is how fast people can change their views on others. Many white people had different views on African Americans, but as soon as they met someone who found their views incorrect they would change what they thought to conform with everyone else. This process of thinking would cause more isolation between two races before they would be able to integrate and you can see that in today's society as well because that process of thinking still exists just in different ways.

cassidy oliver said...

The most memorable thing from the book is the conditions of the north. The conditions were not that different, and because of that the experiences were similar. The journey was well lived because of the experiences during it. The migration is often disregarded as a moment in history, but it is a crucial part of the black experience.

Jaleelah Muhammad said...

One thing I thought that was memorable was the struggle to find acceptance in both the Black and White communities. Many black families weren't entirely supportive of their loved ones plans to leave the south and whites weren't happy about the blacks moving to the North. Even the Northern Blacks treated their own with such disgust that it was shameful. That type is mentality still occurs today unfortunately.

Jessica D said...

The most memorable thing from the book is how blacks were treated back then. Some of the ways they were treated continues today despite the migration. Its crazy how someone isn't liked and mistreated based off the color of their skin. We as a country have made significant improvements about race, but it hasn't gone away completely despite the many efforts. This problem will never go away if people keep thinking one race is superior to the other.

Jeremiah B. said...

One of the things that I found most memorable about this book was that Wilkerson implemented firsthand stories of what people had to go through back then to get where we are now. It really puts things into perspective for me when I get to read personal encounters of the adversity that the generations before mine had to deal with all over the country.

Niagra Bee said...

I really appreciated the use of real people's stories. The worst thing about struggles like this is for victims to go unheard and this gave many people a voice. The most disturbing thing that was displayed to me was the fact that so many people went out of their ways to terrorize innocent people.

-Que'rra

Fiona Hill said...

The thing I found most memorable is that all the stories were very different from each other but they were similar at the same time. I like how the stories were unfiltered and unaltered. It was very interesting to read first hand, historical accounts. I loved seeing the characters journeys, trials and triumphs throughout the story.

Natalie Thompson said...

The idea that I found most memorable in this book were on pages 270-371. The neighborhoods that the blacks lived in and the conditions that they lived in set the foundations for ghettos. I find this more memorable because I have lived in St. Louis city all my life. When you visit some areas of the city, you apartment complexes known as the "projects" or the "ghetto". I never really understood why that was. The majority of the people that live there are low income, over crowded and a lot of crime. When reading this section it started to make me wonder if that's how the ghettos started. Things now are slightly different here in St. Louis because you have different races that live in the inner city, but you can definitely tell the difference between the parts that are majority black. On page 271, it was mentioned how East St. Louis was known as the "forgotten island", and it appears to still appear that way to this current day.

Kelsey W said...

The most memorable moment I can think of is when Robert Pershing Foster made the long trip from the south to California. He was driving through the desert and couldn't find a hotel to sleep in and thought he was making the journey all for nothing because California would be the same as the south but he got there and asked for a black hotel and the people were so confused. This is so memorable because just as he had almost lost all hope, he kept pushing through and this meant he had made it out of the Jim Crow south, finally.

Olivia S. said...

This book simply reinforced a topic that has been constantly talked about for years. Although I agree that bringing awareness to the mistreatment of minorities is of great concern, that isn't the only side to the story. I am of mixed race: white, black, and Native
American. I realize that all of my ancestors hated one anther and some family members still do. I've been called many racial slurs, a mutt, etc. by the very people that share the same bloodline. The take I have on this book is that yes, the past is important, but the future is more important. The events in this were tragic and should not be forgotten, however, I prefer to think of the progression towards equality since then and still to come.

Andrea R. said...

I found the journey itself to be the most intriguing because it was done on such a large scale. It wasn't just about the migration, but also uprooting entire families and transitioning from one way of life to another. Many people know that it happened and that it was a crucial part of American history after the Civil War, but extent of their knowledge is usually just the Harlem Renaissance. Yet, probably don't entirely grasp what the migrants had to give up in order to move up north.

It would also be interesting to compare the Great Migration in the US to the Syrian refugee crisis going on in Europe right now.

Joi M said...

One of the most memorable things I have taken away is that this book isn't just about history. Although these stories took place in the past, the issues are still relevant today. Issues that blacks were faced during the great migration, such as being pitted against other minority groups, still trouble us decades later. Not only is this book a great reminder of the past, but it is a great reminder of our current state as well.

Naomi Thompson said...

I think the most memorable thing from the book is the migration itself. Even though blacks were treated poorly in the South and wanted to leave, it was so difficult for them to leave. They had to first get a good, reliable means of transportation and then make the journey. They were at risk the entire time they were traveling because they had to stop multiple times to rest and any stop was dangerous. Racist white people would drive the same routes and if a group was stopped then bad things could happen to them, even though they weren't hurting anyone. This was insane to me. It was like they could either stay in the South where they were being killed, beaten, jailed, etc or try to travel to a different city which was a danger in itself. I couldn't make that decision for my family.

Jazmyn Maggitt said...

The thing I enjoyed most was the personal stories. I always enjoy reading first-hand stories but even more so when there are so many similar stories that you know without doubt what they say is what actually happened. It's just so much easier to connect all of it back to you. Plus, it helps mentally put in their shoes which is vital for a generation like this one who hasn't had to live through as many hardship as past ones.

jingolder said...

The memorable thing from the book was the transition of lifestyle for those that moved from the south to the north. The same social complications persisted, but with the changing geographic area brought new struggles of simply being even more uncomfortable in your environment than you were before. This opened my eyes to the fact that things did not gradually get better as some moved north, but probably became more stressful and emotionally draining long before they improved.

-John H.

Trion T. said...

The most memorable thing to me is hearing stories about when people actually arrived in the north. In an ideal world, one would think that after black people made it to the north, everything would be so much easier and quality of life would increase exponentially. But this is not the case for every black family that made it to the north. One story that portrays this is that of Henry Clark and how he and his family were chased out of their home not only by the neighbors but by the police as well.

Peyton D. said...

I agree with Breanna B. The thing that was the most memorable about this book to me was how young black people disrespect themselves and fall into the trap of "playing their societal role." This does not apply to all young black people of course but it is very prevalent in present society, especially on a college campus. My boyfriend and I have conversations like this daily. While there are many things that are out of our control, as a race we must stand up together and conduct ourselves with self-respect. When we respect ourselves, we demand respect from those around us.

Quincy S said...

The concept that is most memorable for me from this book, is the growth and prosper that each of the individuals endured. Reading the experiences these people went through, reminds me that even in the face of adversity and outright discrimination African Americans continue to overcome. The accomplishments of these people in spite of their life circumstances shows that we have and will always overcome the injustices of our society.

Conradette King said...

I really like that we got to follow the lives of the characters through so many decades. This made it easier to connect with the family and it gave us an insight to hoe life was for African Americans who moved from the south to the North.

Keanu Rodriguez said...

One of the most memerable things in the book to me was also the most concerning. On page 439 it said "Colored Only and White Only signs were coming down all over the South during the 1960s. But Sheriff McCall did not take down the Colored Waiting Room sign in his office until September 1971, only under threat of a federal court order." This quote still amazes me because to me, this very quote embodied the TRUE depressing reality of the US despite the "change" that should have occurred. Despite the fact that the LAW ITSELF changed in the favor of blacks, this hateful action of this sheriff (a respected person of authority) keeping segregation signs ILLEGALLY, shows that even laws abolishing certain actions cannot change the true natures of the people committing the actions. Although this is extremely distressing, this shows the reality of the world that we live in, and this particular instance gives insight about our country even decades after it happened.

Lawrence Payne said...

I would say the most memorable thing, was the struggle of moving from a place considered home into the unknown for a better life. Families back then and now still have either the same or similar problems. I also say the struggle is memorable because, we are still struggling now for an equal opportunity to make a difference as the black community right now is considered to be full of violence. I'm from Chicago and know that not only from my parents but this book as well is that there is no such thing as a good life without struggles along the way.

Lawrence Payne said...

I would say the most memorable thing, was the struggle of moving from a place considered home into the unknown for a better life. Families back then and now still have either the same or similar problems. I also say the struggle is memorable because, we are still struggling now for an equal opportunity to make a difference as the black community right now is considered to be full of violence. I'm from Chicago and know that not only from my parents but this book as well is that there is no such thing as a good life without struggles along the way.

Persephone C. said...

The most memorable part of the book for me was when the black migrants moved from the south to the north and the black people who already lived their treated the new migrants badly. I just do not understand how they thought they were any better than the new migrants, and they were black as well. They should have tried to help the new migrants instead of belittle them. They had a long, rough, journey to the north, but even when they arrived they were still treated unequally.

Maya Searcy said...

As much as I learned in school about slavery, the civil war, and tension between the north and the south, I never learned much about the migration of African Americans from the south to the north. I also never realized how difficult it was even in the north. I liked reading about the personal stories and I found it intresting that Wilkerson interviewed over 1,000 people and at the end of the process ened with 3 people.

Tiera Williams said...

The thing I found most surprising in the book was some of the discrimination the new migrants faced when making the move to up north. I thought it was so surprising that they faced discrimination from people who were in their same situation not too long ago. This book really allowed you to come face to face with how big the divide was and how bad the discrimination was back then. Leads me to really wonder what would like be like now without the Great Migration.

Tiera W.

Jessica Oranika said...

I found the whole book extremely interesting because it is hard to imagine ever going through something like that. In this day and age where people are still fighting racial injustices such as police brutality, lower wages and 20% longer jail sentences for the same crimes, its hard to imagine a time where an average Joe white man; not even the police or person of authority, could kill, lynch, or hang you without any repercussions. Though it may seem discouraging to our generation when we protest against things and not get the result we wanted. A book like this shows where we came from, how much worse things used to be and how much more dangerous it was to speak up against what was happening back then. It shows that its not about each individual battle and that we should not give up in our fight for freedom, fairness and equality because, slowly but surely, it is paying off.

Xavier Morrison- Wallace said...

What I really enjoyed about this book is the different perspectives of the Great Migration.
From Foster's point of view we saw the adjustment to a different society from the upper class perspective. In Ida Mae's view we got a chance to see the city from the lower class perspective and up close to the working people in it. George saw the actual Great Migration take place in front of him. Even though he never really had a chance to settle, he still experienced the great migration. The three different perspectives also highlighted the different types of achievements that can occur from financial, education, or spiritual(531-532) all of which could not have occurred in the Jim Crow south.

Carlie Bibbs said...

One idea I found most notable from the novel was the incredible amount of bravery and strength it took for migrants to realize their current conditions and then drop everything for a chance at a new life. If someone asked me to drop everything right now I'd be terrified of new change. But the migrants still decided to face their fears because they wanted to live a better life and have their children grow up in a better environment. The migrants' willigness to seek a better future is the main reason I ended up in Chicago myself. And the author's use of personal stories just helped me to better visualize the struggles that many people faced during their journeys.

-Carlie Bibbs

Isaiah Blackburn said...

The intertwining of the personal stories with the current national news events happening at that time really helps the reader to understand the kind of thoughts and feelings that drove people to migrate north. It kind of reminds me of the movie 'Forrest Gump' except that the appearance of historical events only acts as a placeholder to tell you what year it is. This style of writing is very captivating and this novel provided a more in depth view of the Great Migration that we would not have learned in a regular history class.

Brianna R. said...

I enjoyed reading this book because it reminded me how far we have truly come as a collective group of people. I think it becomes really easy for current generations to forget that we have everything that we do because of those who paved the way before up. It is also easy for us to take things for granted because we have not been made to suffer like our ancestors did. Although it is more than evident there are still numerous obstacles against us, we have to realize that we have to continue to fight to make an even brighter future for generations to come. Something memorable about this book was the growth and evolution of the characters. It was interesting to see how their changes in environment and social changes both aided and hindered them. It was rewarding to see how the characters overcame and accomplished. Truly a powerful and emotional book.

Emmanuel Ogunbode said...

One idea that I found to be very interesting was the description of Bill Russel's life.Learning about Russel's history from a sports aspect never teaches about what he actually had to go through and the different adversities that he had to fight to become the legend that he is today.

Kiana S said...

I think what makes this book so amazing is that it goes over a wide timespan and captures the lives of those who were part of this huge moment in history. All of the hardships and challenges that these people went through are highlighted in typical history articles, but this novel delves a little bit deeper and I think that is what sets this apart from other pieces.

Jonathan Pittman said...

The most memorable thing about this book would have to be Pershing's story. He had a lot of things going for him throughout his life and it was really interesting to see him lose it all. In comparison with Ida Mae and Starling story lines, Pershing had grasped my attention the most with Ida Mae being a close second. He was so successful in his private practice but as soon as his wife passed everything went downhill and it really drew a contrast between him and the other characters. Especially since after he had left the south his troubles were few in number compared to everybody else's.

Tayler G said...

I really enjoyed this book. I got a better insight on my African American history. I also liked that even though this book was based on past events I can still relate to some of the issues and struggle the characters faced. I wasn't really surprised about any stories in the book but I was more surprised at how relevant the problems people back then faced are still some of the problems we face today.

Dakarai P. said...

The most memorable thing for me was the struggle of moving away from the place you've lived your entire life and everyone you've ever met to an unknown city in hopes of a better life. Honestly, I'm not sure I would have been brave enough or strong enough to be able to do the same if I was in their shoes. Migrants left the South in hopes of creating better lives for not only themselves, but for their children and all other future generations.

Paris Smith said...

I really enjoyed the book. I knew about the migration to the north, but it was nice and insightful to get to the root of what was happening. All you learn about in school was that they escape and travel up North to find a better life but I never knew what really happened in between whether is was good or bad and some of the problems that they faced back then are problems that we still face today and it just goes to show that history repeats itself until someone stands up to change it.

Lindsey McCall said...

The most memorable thing in the book was the description of the struggle of acceptance in both the white community and our own community. If we don't feel welcomed at home, how do we expect to feel welcomed anywhere else?

Tameah Foley said...

I liked how this book gave me a more authentic look into the past few decades. The part I found most interesting was how many of the African-Americans in the South were afraid to migrate to the North. Also, I found it surprising that people in the North were still prejudice toward the African-Americans who migrated there. Overall, I found this book very interesting and would recommend it.

Jenee B. said...

The thing that I found most memorable were the stories and perspectives given by each of the people featured in the book. This made the book much more enjoyable to read than a book simply containing facts about the past. It also helped me to get into the book as I became somewhat attached to each of the people and their life stories. The stories and the author's elaborate descriptions of things also made it easier to imagine being in the different settings myself.

Alona Davenport said...

The most memorable part of this story would have to be when they actually make it to the north. I always assumed that everyone was just accepting of the African Americans and that everything was all sunshine and rainbows. But I found out that that was the complete opposite that happened. They still had all of these rules that they had to follow and they weren't as accepted as I thought they were.

Joshua Jones said...

The book was amazing. My insight on African American history was increased. I loved Ida Mae's story the most because it was the initial one and it allowed me to fully understand how the migration impacted black people positively and negatively.

-Joshua J.

Mercedes H said...

Overall, the book was a really interesting and pleasant read. I do not think I can really pinpoint one specific message or topic that was more interesting than the other because I read and learned a lot. The African American history and struggles were relayed very well and gave me a lot of insight as well as knowledge that I did not previously have. One key thing that kind of stuck out though was the fact of problems and situation that were presented about the African American history that we still face today. So I pose the question as we come to an end, is it actually history if we still experience the same problems today?

Anonymous said...

Overall the concept of getting real life, detailed stories was the most interesting to me. In history I always learned about it, but I never really got to hear real life experiences. My history classes would also just give a brief description of all the major events that happened in that point in history, there was never really much detail. If I did hear/read stories, they were always about well-known people, such as Harriet Tubman. So, it was nice to be able to read stories about different things and events.
Sydney J.

Anitra B. said...

I really enjoyed reading this book this semester. I really like getting to know each character through their different stories. The most memorable part for me was when they made it to the North. Even when they made it to the North times were hard. After reading this book, I definitely have a better insight of what African Americans had to go through. This book was a great read!

Kytela Medearis said...

The idea I found most memorable is that although things HAVE changed..there are still a lot of similarities. I loved being able to read stories and examples because it made ot easier to understand and somewhat relate to. Just the other day I was talking about this book to my peers and they all loved the concept and expressed interest in reading it!

Sierra Ewing said...

In general, I haven't read a more honest, transparent and fresh perspective on racial issues in the American past. I really did learn a lot. The most challenging idea that I found in this text was that every cycle has vicious, tenacious roots. The cycles that generations past and future black generations will face are destructive. I can also appreciate and identify with the struggle of the African American people a lot more. It is so easy to dismiss what we have not personally experienced, but this book made a lot more hardships real to me and now I am much more grateful for the people that came before me and their sacrifices, bravery and persistence. I really love being a young, black women. I can only hope that my story is worth telling like theirs.

Roland Wooters said...

The most interesting part of this book was the entire journey itself. Most people are unable to understand another person's struggle. However, when you document the stories of multiple people that all are going through the same thing, it truly puts everything in perspective. That is the brilliance of this novel. I knew about the Great Migration but not to this extent. It really allows me to appreciate the struggle that occurred before me, and to take advantage of every opportunity I have now a days - since so many people struggled so I could be at this point.

Ashya Ford said...

Overall, I would have to say that this book was pretty awesome. It made me think about things in a different light pertaining to self and my social environment. I was also able to really see and understand certain portions of my history that were once unclear. For instance, when discussing African American history in high school, we learned about slavery then segregation...then that was it. In this book I came to understand that the migration wasn't even that long ago and some of the effects and attitudes surrounding it still exist today.

Ashley B said...

I enjoyed the chapter where Wilkerson discussed how African Americans headed North despite the disapproval of family and friends. If it wasn't for these strong individuals thinking about the greater good, there is no telling where we would be today. It takes a lot of strength and courage to change ones circumstances and you can't let the opinions of others get in the way.

Kayleigh E. said...

The idea I found most interesting was the generational gap. When looking/thinking back it is easy to assume that all African Americans thought the same way about slavery and civil rights. The Warmth of Other Suns gave us a look into different peoples lives and thoughts. I remember reading that one older gentlemen thought that the younger African American generation was taking their freedoms for granted. I am sure that the younger generation thought that they deserved those rights and freedoms. It gave me a new perspective to look at things through.

Natasha said...

What I found most interesting (well, inspiring) is that the book as a whole gives me so much motivation. When I was reading about what all the people did, it made me realize, I can take on challenges too. Even though they don't involve risking my life or moving across the country, it just gives me hope. It shows how strong humans are capable of being. I hope to read more books like this in the future because even though it was depressing at points, this is our history. This is what my ancestors had to face. Now it's our generation's turn. Let's make them proud.