Wednesday, October 7, 2015

The Rise [Reflections]

[The Rise]



We're just getting started on The Rise by Sarah Lewis, but what do you think so far? What key reflection or observation have you lingered on for a while and why? Please provide a page number when possible.

Related:
Sept. 9: Archer’s Paradox
Sept. 16: The Unfinished Masterpiece
Sept. 23: Blankness
Sept. 30: Arctic Summer: Surrender

33 comments:

Kiana S said...

I think what has stood out the most to me is the quote that I referred to in my previous post on page 78. It has really been dwelling in my thought process, especially this past week. I have been struggling in my classes and I have been reflecting on my decision to be an engineering major. I then thought back on this quote and realized that all of my hard work will pay off and that it will be worth it because "if it wasn't tough, there would be queues and hoards of people out here!"

Georgy N said...

What really stuck with me was the section on surrendering. It is very easy and common to see surrendering as a failure and something negative. But sometimes it is just what we need to improve our way of thinking and actions. The quote on page 78 really emphasizes how it is our attitude towards failure that determines how we view it and how we ultimately deal with it. "You could argue that failure is not a punishment and...success is not reward. They're just failure and success. You can choose how to respond". It can be a push towards something greater or the thing that puts us at rock bottom.

Shervonti N. said...

The Rise by Sarah Lewis is definitely interesting thus far. I enjoy the more abstract thought processes that go on throughout this book. One of my favorite things is the talk of "surrender" on pages 86 and 87. "To surrender means not giving up, but giving over. 'For after all,' Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote, 'the best thing one can do / When it is raining, is to let it rain.'" The idea of surrendering has always held a negative connotation for me but this chapter forced me to think about it differently. It is almost like coming to terms with something you want to have control over but it is not possible. That does not have to be negative because when people "let it rain," they are pushing themselves to a new limit. It is possible to become triumphant after surrendering your control in a situation.

Jacqueline C. said...

So far, the book has been interesting. One of the things that stood out to me the most was a quote by Saunders on page 70, "To convert our own energy and operate at full force, often we must first surrender." To me, it was saying that to be the best we can be, we need to see our faults and get stronger from our downfalls.Everyone has the opportunity to do this and grow as an individual.

Alexandra J said...

This book has a lot of quotes and content that inspires you to keep pushing towards your goals. In particular, this quote early in the book caught my attention, "What we want but do not have creates our onward march." p 33. I like this because its a reminder that there is in fact light at the end of the tunnel, even though sometimes it is hard to see it. This quote is all about thinking long term. It reminds me that what I want is attainable but will require work. Even though hard work is required, the journey or "march" will be worth it in the long run and to keep pushing in that direction.

Reed B. said...

Out of the chapters we have read thus far, the very first is still the one that resonates most with me. The particular idea which stuck with me was that our successes in life, more often than we think, are due to our many failed attempts made prior. In my previous post I mentioned the quote "Who apart from ourselves, can see any difference between our victories and our defeats" (12). For some reason this quote is just such a powerful idea to me, and I feel I can truly completely agree and identify with it. As college students, I think there is at least one time throughout our academic career where we have failed at one thing or another, and someone else has come along and tried to define us by that failure. This chapter basically gave me the idea that it is not up to others to decide that the failures we make will limit our potential, but it is ourselves who must choose if we will let that happen.

Brianna R.

Jaleelah Muhammad said...

Of the chapters that we have read, the chapter about Blankness is the one has stuck with me. There were a lot of aspects that I had never considered before and I was surprised to find that I could apply some of those aspects to my day to day life especially the topic of safe havens on pages 49-53. I am interested to see what the rest of the book has to say.

Mikaela S said...

A quote that has really resonated with me is found on page 24. It is amazing how individuals can continue to grow and learn beyond what we think we can, "At the point of mastery, when there seems nothing left to move beyond, we find a way to move beyond ourselves" (Lewis 24). Even when we think we have me our most challenging goal, there is always room for improvement and there is always something more that can be done.

Baileigh Scott said...

The Rise is a novel that I initially could not connect with. I enjoy reading, and I enjoy books that give me a challenge, but this one has been hard to keep reading. However, it does force me to think and to take a look at my own life to see the true meaning of some things. The chapter about criticism made me step back and take a hard look at my life, and all the people in it that have made me feel less than worthy, or even those who I have caused to feel this way. The world today is such a stereotypical place, and there is only one way to be. Learning to overcome this judgement of others is the best way to become the best one can be. After this chapter, pages 51 and 52, the novel struck something inside of me and became much easier to keep reading. This novel seems so sophisticated to me, and I feel as though I am learning so much by reading it. Very interesting!

Baileigh Scott

Conradette King said...

I found the chapter to be the most compelling to me. The thought that many of our successes are due to the countless failures that we have endured is really comforting to me. As an athlete and college student, I am constantly going through failures that have inspired me to keep going for my dreams. I really find the book interesting so far and hope to continue reading more insightful thoughts from the author.

Natalie Thompson said...

The quote I posted last week it on that stands out to me the most so far and is the most remeberable. (p.66) " Clearly you cant change anything thats going in in this harsh place, but yiu start ti understand its rhythms, and seasons." It takes me back to when I was a child. You had no control over your life, you just really existed. Life is hard and it reminds me so much of the artic as described in the Artic Summer: Surrender chapter. This book is a very good read.

Aliyah B. said...

One story that stood out to me begins on page 61; the chapter is titled, "Arctic Summer: Surrender". Initially, I was frustrated with Saunders. I thought that his desire to journey across the arctic was naïve and dangerous. However, I continued reading anyway.

The quote that intrigued me the most is found on page 70, "to convert our own energy and operate at full force, often we must first surrender." Whenever we are faced with any form of defiance, we often try to fight against it.

This chapter taught me that sometimes we need to surrender. We have to try giving into our pain and accepting it instead of always trying to fight against it. That can often be the key to our victory and to living our lives to the fullest.

Kayleigh E. said...

So far the part I have found most interesting was the unfinished masterpiece thinking about that whole concept. It really made me think about all the amazing things that may not be here today if someone did not finish their work. Or all the undiscovered potential there is for people that may not know they have it. So much of today's writing, art, movies, etc are inspired by previous things. If we did not have those before who knows what we would have today.

Paris Smith said...

I really likes pages 86 and 87 where it said, "to surrender means not giving up, but giving over. 'For after all,' Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote, 'the best thing one can do / When it is raining, is to let it rain.'" I feel like that statement is so true because there are times in life when there is nothing you can do but let things be and I know that it is hard to let go and let God but things happen for a reason and sometimes, things just have to be. There have been times in my life where I have wanted to help or try to do something but I couldn't. I just had to stand there and let things happen the way that they are supposed to happen. This quote made me realize that I wasn't giving up or surrendering, I was actually doing more by wanting to help and letting things happen naturally because if I would have intervened and made things worse, I would have never forgiven myself and then I would be no good to anybody, so sometimes I need to realize that I should take a step back and say that I have done all that I can and I just need to let nature take its course.

Belainesh Nigeda said...

As I read the Rise, I think that my favorite page is 78. On this page, I was able to connect with his concept of unlived lives within us. Of course, this isn't to be taken literally, but this is most relevant to me now that I am young. So far, I have lived the life of a child, of a teenager, of a college student, of a soul searcher and I'm only 20. I can only imagine the part of me that I have yet to "lived."

I also loved when the author quotes her Buddhist teacher when he said, "pain is not punishment. And pleasure is not a reward. You could argue that failure is not punishment...success is not reward. They're just failure and success. You can choose how you respond (78). This quote is basically the journey of life. You can choose how you respond to the failures and pain in your life (either find a lesson in it/appreciate and celebrate you getting past it or stay complacent/don't move on). Life is full of failures, pain, "punishments", and success.

-Belainesh N.

Tashawna N. said...

So far, reading The Rise has been alright. I like this book because of all the different quotes within it because they make you step back and take a look at your life and see things differently when you react to a situation. If I would have to pick a favorite quote from the book comes from the end of the first chapter. "Who apart from ourselves can see any difference between our victories and defeats?" This quote is my favorite because I have had people tell me that I failed at something that I don't think I failed at. This quote is a reminder that really what other people think does not matter. Overall, this book is very interesting and I am looking forward to continue reading it.
~Tashawna Nash

Mercedes H said...

The Rise has definitely been a great read so far. One thing throughout the novel that caught my attention and left me pondering was the topic of a near win. The fact that "what might have been" (25) can drive a person to strive even harder than they ever have before hits home. Throughout life no one should ever let a failure stop them from pushing on and doing better. I appreciate this topic a lot because it has made me want to continue to go beyond my capabilities despite my failure and to not let "what might have been" stop me from what will be.

Jenee B. said...

The idea that I have lingered on was one from the chapter Arctic Summer: Surrender; the idea that surrendering to something doesn't always mean admitting defeat and giving up, but instead can mean opening oneself up to bigger and better possibilities. The quote from the chapter that especially stuck with me was on page 71 where the author writes, "Yet when feelings of failure come with their own form of pain, empowerment through accepting it--surrender-- and pivoting out of it can be more powerful than fighting". It also stood out to me when the author wrote, "Having disempowered what threatens to do us the most harm, we are shored up with the knowledge that nothing else truly can" (pg.75).

Anitra B. said...

I too have found this book hard to enjoy. The beginning was kind of slow to me and did not catch my interest. The one chapter that I did connect with was "Blankness", specifically the part where Lewis discussed criticism and creativity. The part about criticism was interesting to me because sometimes you do have to reflect and determine where it's coming from; a place of genuine care or out of ill will? When Lewis described creativity she stated something along the lines of when we're under pressure we can see creativity but most of believe that pressure can cause a lack of creativity. I thought that this was interesting because it's something that I find to be true. Sometimes my best work happens when I'm under pressure.

Sierra E said...

This book resonates so much with me and I assume other Haley scholars as it speaks directly to the character and tendencies of leaders and thinkers. I appreciate how honest and vulnerable the book is, but also challenging and insightful. I, too, enjoyed the section on surrender like some of the other readers. That is such a good reminder for me to be open to what the future holds and to recognize when I am in the way of my own growth and success. I think the way that the author speaks to the reader is very engaging. I also appreciate the section discussing criticism. It is good to evaluate myself, reset goals and let others challenge and critique me. It is also good to realize that that criticism is often the push I need to be and do better. The Rise is a great book excited to see how it wraps up in the next few chapters.

Tiera Williams said...

I really like the book The Rise thus far. I thought I'd like it from the moment I picked it up, just because I've enjoyed all of the book I've had to read for my JH assignments. On page 11 the author says,"The word failure is imperfect." This is one of many relevant points made since I began reading and it's very applicable to college students. The definition of failure is a matter of perspective, as are many things. As I continue to read, the book continues to touch on relevant matters I can relate to and I think its important to keep a relevant read by your side, especially while going through college.

- Tiera W.

Ashya Ford said...

I actually enjoy this more than I have enjoyed any of the other materials we have read thus far. I think it resonates with me because I can relate to the concept of accepting failures and their necessity to our lives. At this stage in my life, I understand that success would not be valued as much if it were not for our failures. I also understand that while failure is inevitable, it is also a humbling experience that gives birth to better ideas and more strategic plans.

Kiara G. said...

The idea that has been dwelling on me from this book is the one about accepting failure as a life lesson and moving on from it. There are a lot of aspects in our lives, whether it be school, relationships, loss of loved ones etc. that we dwell on and it seems as though we hold on to things much longer than we should. I think it is important to live in the present, and not worry about what has already happened or what can possibly happen tomorrow. Failure helps to see what you've done wrong and acknowledge ways to improve in the future, but it should not be something to be ashamed of because no one is perfect and life is a never ending journey.

Olivia Slater said...

It took me well over 50 pages to actually enjoy or relate to this book in any way. However, when the author wrote "To convert our own energy and operate at full force, often we must first surrender" (p. 70), my attention was sparked. This idea that surrendering our own wants, wishes, etc., in order to reach our full potential really spoke to me. Although I do not necessarily agree with this statement, it is a powerful idea that made me want to further understand the author's intentions.

Olivia Slater said...

It took me well over 50 pages to actually enjoy or relate to this book in any way. However, when the author wrote "To convert our own energy and operate at full force, often we must first surrender" (p. 70), my attention was sparked. This idea that surrendering our own wants, wishes, etc., in order to reach our full potential really spoke to me. Although I do not necessarily agree with this statement, it is a powerful idea that made me want to further understand the author's intentions.

Joi M said...

The part about surrendering different parts of your life has been the best to me simply because it seems to be the idea that I continually use. The discussion on page 73 really calls for a certain amount of discipline as well. Just knowing that to surrender is having the knowledge and strength to know when it is appropriate makes it an ongoing challenge, which allows it to stay a relevant topic.

Ajeenah Johnson-Brown said...

I am really enjoying the The Rise by Sarah Lewis thus far. I particularly like all the quotes and examples she uses of people pushing towards their goals. The book is definitely properly named because it is almost a guide or aid in a sense, for those of us on the rise. It is inspirational, especially for us students who are looking to achieve our goals.

Ashley B said...

I have actually enjoyed reading the "The Rise". The rise provides a lot of great insight by making people actually think about the different concepts in the book. Lewis does a great job of explaining and having her audience relate to the different stories. One of my favorite lines from the book was when Lewis stated "People driven by a pursuit that puts them on the edges are often not on the periphery, but on the frontier, testing the limits of what it is possible to withstand and discover". I love this quote because often times when people find themselves on the edge they want to give up, not knowing that they are heading in the right direction.

Alicia Sears said...

So far the book has really been enjoyable and challenges my everyday style of thinking. It makes me want to worker harder and not give up so easily on things that may seem out of my reach or above the glass ceiling that holds a lot of minority people back.

Kelsey W said...

This book so far has really been making me think about my goals. I think it's fair to say we all have goals whether they be big or small. The important and scarier part though is how to implement ways to reach those goals. On page 49 they say that we accomplish certain things "because we are free enough to take risks, and fail if necessary." Failing is definitely what everyone is afraid of including me. At least if we fail though, we would have tried and I think that should just give us more strength and motivation to try again.

cassidy oliver said...

One of the most eye opening chapters thus far would have to be Archer's Paradox. Though the whole book is about human creativity, this chapter resonates with me personally. The author presented the idea that people focus on improbable rises when they are underestimated (Lewis 9). Being underestimated can be common for many college students who lack the support. Without that support, many are forced to thrive almost in order to prove a point.

Quincy Sanderlin said...

A concept that has stuck with me since starting this book, is the idea of the "near win" in "The Unfinished Masterpiece" chapter. I found this idea interesting, because the author describes how a "near win" propels people even further toward success. She even describes it as jolt on page 26. The fact that just barely missing a goal, makes us work even harder to achieve it, instead of giving up stands out as a powerful concept in her book so far.

Maya Estell said...

In the early stages of reading The Rise by Sarah Lewis I have already found that, it is important to divulge ourselves in the things that don't always win awards. What I mean by this is understanding the value of the "ignored ideas". I believe that the author wants to pinpoint the creativity of those that may often go ignored or un noticed, in order to show people that it is possible to unearth your own creativity and use it to your best ability.