Wednesday, September 9, 2015

The Rise: Archer's Paradox


[The Rise]

In the first chapter of The Rise, Sarah Lewis begins discussing the topic that will pervade the book: mastery. At one point, she notes that "mastery is not merely a commitment to a goal, but to a curved line, constant pursuit" (8).

What idea or key point from the first chapter caught your attention and why? Please provide a page number.

18 comments:

Shervonti N said...

A key point in this chapter that caught my attention would have to be the first mention of the word "failure." The author talked about a college essay that she submitted about the importance and disadvantages of failure. The idea of that alone lead me to believe that the set up to this book would consist of more abstract thought. Furthering this thought, the end of the chapter consisted of an insert about how people normally attempt to avoid actually using the word failure and instead describe "failures" as learning experiences, trials, and reinventions. (Page 12) Reflecting upon myself, I have realized that this is very true but I also feel that optimism about your failures will allow you to continue on instead of stopping because of the first bad thing to occur on your road to success.

Brianna R. said...

An idea that caught my attention was when the author stated that our failures are some of our greatest advantages. She suggested that failure is almost like an insight that someone else who hadn't experienced that same failure would then lack. This is an idea that seems to have existed for eternity, that most of the time it is the ability to recover from a near fatal blow that allows for growth, rather than the easy conquest. Despite knowing this, it is still so fascinating to believe that it could actually be true. I particularly liked the quote of Christopher Fly that the author inserted which read, "Who apart from ourselves, can see any difference between our victories and our defeats" (12). To me, this basically meant that we are our own makers despite the impact we let ourselves believe other people's opinions have on our paths. Ultimately, we choose if something will break us or make us better, we just have to realize we possess that much power.

Brianna Reed

Kelsey W said...

Honestly, the beginning of the chapter bored me and I couldn't quite get into it. Then when the author changed the setting to her grandparents house and started talking about creative design, then that intrigued me. On page 11, when she used the phrase "powerful surrender," that was interesting. It got me thinking that whether to succeed or fail, we are surrendering ourselves and being vulnerable in our attempts at success and really that's the most important thing.

Jaleelah Muhammad said...

On page 5, Lewis begins to describe the different types of skills that an archer acquires during practice and she mentions one called "Constant Reinvention" which is basically being able to see yourself in a better state or position than the one you were just in. That stood out to me the most because as college students, we are constantly faced with obstacles that challenge us to the point where we think we've hit rock bottom, but what we have to realize is that it is not the end. There are better days to come, that sometimes tomorrow's outlook is brighter and that we just have to keep striving.
- Jaleelah M.

Ashley B said...

I agree with Kelsey W. The beginning of the chapter was definitely uninteresting. I'm going to assume she got into the technical language of archery because it will help with the read later on. One part that did interest me, on page 6, was when Lewis discussed how archers change their techniques when they start scoring really high. She said they focus less on their shooting and tend more to their concentration, breathing techniques, meditation, and visualization. Before reading this, I was completely unaware that archers did such things to help them score better. It's interesting that when archers get higher scores; they shoot less.

Olivia Slater said...

The very first part of the reading that caught my attention was on page 5 when the author mentioned the following: "If an archer's aim is off by less than half a degree, she won't hit her target". This made me think of life in general and route we must take in order to achieve our goals. Staying focused is essential to becoming successful. This idea also sparked my interest for the rest of the book because the idea of focus and and concentration in order to achieve our goals is essential to any college students' life.

Anitra B. said...

As others state above, I too found the beginning of the chapter a little uninteresting, but I believe that it will tie into the rest of the book as we read on. An idea that caught my attention was on page 7 when Lewis mentioned that there was a difference between mastery and success. Success being an "event-based victory" while mastery is something that is more constant, you have to repeatedly be able to do something. I guess it caught my attention because I never thought about the actual difference between the two and Lewis had a really good explanation. I used the two words interchangeably, but she clearly lays out the difference between the two. Another thing that I found interesting was when she described the processes and techniques that the archers use. I was unaware of how much was put into archery (i.e. meditation, breathing techniques, visualization, ability to concentrate, etc.).

Tiera Williams said...

The thing that caught my attention the most is stated on page 11. It says, "The word failure is imperfect." I think this is a very relevant point, because not everyone looks at failure the same way. According to Merriam Webster failure means, "lack of success." However lack of success is sometimes a part of succeeding. I don't view trial and error as failing, but another person may view every error as failing. It's all about perception, hence the reason "failure in imperfect."

Tiera W.

Baileigh S said...

While I agree that the first chapter of the novel was incredibly uninteresting, the part about failure spoke to me. I have always believed firmly that failure is what creates success. I liked the part of the novel where the author wrote about failure bringing advantage. It makes all the sense in the world that someone who fails often but learns something is going to be better off than someone who does not fail or does not try to become better due to their failures. On page 12, the author writes about people not wanting to call their failures "failures." I see where this is coming from, but I do not agree with it. I think those who fail and are not afraid to openly admit that they have failed will become more successful in the end than those who deny that they have not succeeded, only got off path. When it comes down to it, we all fail. It is one of the only characteristics of the human race that make us all the same. However, what sets us apart is the way in which we take the failure and turn it into something different. Some will deny that they did wrong, some will accept it and become better. To me, calling a failure anything other than what it is, only leads us down a path that will never produce success.

Tashawna N. said...

Unlike many others who found the beginning of this book uninteresting I found it very intriguing. The idea from this first chapter that caught my attention the most comes from page 6. It is when Lewis mentions "gold fever" also known as "target panic". I think that this idea caught my attention the most because it is one that I can somewhat relate to. "Gold Fever" in this case refers to when an archer gets good and starts wanting gold and in extreme cases one day can be doing very well and the next be doing very poorly. The part that is relatable to me is when you can be doing well one day and bad the next. As a track runner in high school and doing hurdles and for one meet I would do great for my standards and another day do very poorly which is upsetting for me.

Tashawna Nash

Mikaela S said...

On page 7, the author states that mastery requires endurance, which is a point that caught my eye. Regardless of what you're studying in school, what occupation you're preparing to work in, or any other aspect of life, you have to work to meet your goals. To become a master, it take much perseverance, overcoming obstacles, and dedication.

Aliyah B. said...

I was intrigued by how much intense focus archers take (found on pages 5-6). When the narrator started to talk about how even the tiniest movement can mess up a shot, it made me realize how seriously archers have to take their sport. They have to be 100% present when they're training or competing. They also can't focus on anything but their process, otherwise their ego can impact their shot. They have to remain humble and focused on the task at hand. Even, thinking about how well they've done can turn into "gold fever" and ruin their lucky streak

Paris Smith said...

The idea that caught my eye was when the author said that "the word failure is imperfect". It caught my eye because last semester, the topic for my honors class was about failure and we talked about different types of failure and how failure can mean many different things and how sometimes failure does not mean failure at all. It depends on the perspective of the situation and how failure comes in different forms and that sometimes, failure can be success.

cassidy oliver said...

One of the most interesting ideas in the chapter was that being underestimated is a reason for "improbable rise" (Lewis 9). Most people do not have all of the characteristics needed to be successful according to society's standards. The motivation of being seen as a failure before even getting a chance to prove yourself is very powerful.

Ajeenah Johnson-Brown said...

Lewis state in Chapter 1 that our failures are our own individual advantages because our experiences are not going to be the exact same as the next person's the insight we gain is something no one else would have. Although she presents a valid point, I'm not sure I quite agree. Not everyone gains insight from their failures. There are many people that make the same mistake over and over and over again with no lesson learned. Failures can only be advantages to those that learn from past mistakes.

alicia said...

One of the most interesting concepts I think that Lewis discussed was constant reinvention. This was so interesting to me because at the moment I have not been doing as good as I should in school but I am always picturing myself doing better which helps motivate me.
Alicia Sears

Quincy S said...

A concept that caught my attention in this chapter was the idea of reinvention. Lewis describes this as seeing yourself as the person who can win. This stood out to me because you can be talented, determined, and a hard worker; however, if you don't view yourself as the person who will succeed in a certain goal, you are mentally discounting your own abilities and hindering your success.

Maya Estell said...

In the first chapter of The Rise, Sarah Lewis begins discussing the topic that will pervade the book: mastery. At one point, she notes that "mastery is not merely a commitment to a goal, but to a curved line, constant pursuit" (8).

What idea or key point from the first chapter caught your attention and why? Please provide a page number.

"this skill means focusing on your mark, the likely shape of an arrows arched flight, and the many variables that can knock it off all at once. th most precise archerscall this process of dual focus split vision. it also requires constant reinvention--seeing yourseld as the person who can hit a ten when you just hit a nine" (Lewis, p 5) THis caught my attention, because archery is a very difficult sport to master perhaps on of the hardest. it requires constant practice like the before quote. If you stop or pause you can lose skill therefore i really understood the analogy.