Wednesday, April 30, 2014

The Beautiful Struggle, reflections

 [The Beautiful Struggle]

Well after finishing the second half of The Beautiful Struggle by Ta-Nehisi Coates, what did you find most memorable or noteworthy about the book? Why or how so? Please provide page numbers for any references to specific scenes or concepts that you note.

8 comments:

Joey N. said...

I found the main character's description of the WWF on page 5 the memorable subject presented in the book. I felt this was memorable because when I was younger I used to watch the WWF also so I felt that I could really understand what he was saying.

Isaiah Blackburn said...

Shortly after Coates begins to learn how to play the djembe drum, he seeems to stop pursuing the Knowledge that plagued the streets of Baltimore. Instead, he focused on learning about his African heritage and was very involved in the Sankofa group.

Jamal Sims said...

"No matter what the professional talkers tell you, I never met a black boy who wanted to fail" (180).

This quote stuck out to me the most while reading this book mainly because there is so much truth behind it. Growing up, we all have dreams and aspirations toward what we want to accomplish in life. Obstacles get in the way and things don't always go as planned. The title of the author's work, "The Beautiful Struggle, A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood" was very fitting. I felt the quote above served as a centralized theme in the book. Coates discussed struggles he encountered with family, friends, girlfriends, and his school life.

Robert F said...

It was memorable in chapter 8 when Coate was down in the dumps and he couldn't focus throughout the chapter. He was living, but was not really aware of life passing him by. Sometimes school makes feels this way because of overwhelming homework, so in a way i can relate with Coate.

Deandre Howard said...

"After that, Dad cut Bill loose. They'd been at war all his life, but now bill was seventeen, a grown man in my father's eyes, and mostly set on whatever path would be. He was remanded back to Tioga, but there was no more checking homework, reviewing report cards, or upbraidings for cutting classes. Dad issued the simple ultimatum that all of us lived under--at eighteen you will eave this house--and left the rest in the hands of bill." (120-121)

This happens to Coates as well (in coming of age only). The books often does reach on the subject of manhood: carving out your own path and being responsible for one's self (as expressed by the father many times).

This situation sticks (as well as the similar case of coming-of-age for Coates) out to me because I am at dire odds against some of the implementation (mainly from the Coates' father), and I only agree with certain rough concepts. A man isn't defined by his age nor is a well of wisdom because he is male; he has a path he follows and concepts and ideas that are his own and should be able to form those ideas and thoughts as he pleases even before said person is considered "a man" (He should not be abandoned and expected to make his own path yet set certain standards for him to qualify for manhood. Either it is his choice or not).

-DeAndre H.

Nicholas M. said...

The relationship between coates and his father that show the reality that test us, the myths that sustain us, and the love that saves us.

Belainesh Nigeda said...

After reading this book, I can say that this story is very inspirational for those in the same situation as Ta-Nehisi. This book tells a story about black boys growing up in the city; not only that,but,a journey (beautiful struggle) to manhood. I loved how I could just watch this character mature with age; but most importantly, Ta-Nehisi grew mentally. You can tell the difference between a boy and a man by his actions and words.
-B.Nigeda

Wole A said...

I feel that in our society if African American men are given an outlet to express themselves there would be less violence. Coates was very interested in learning the ups and downs of the streets of Baltimore but, when he got a hold of the djembe drum he was able to shift his focus to a more positive outlet.