Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Haley Reading Group: “Solar, Eclipsed”



[The Best American Science and Nature Writing (2016)]

By Cynthia A. Campbell

Charles C. Mann’s article “Solar, Eclipsed” focuses on India’s increasing emission of greenhouse gases. Mann illuminates coal as an energy source vs solar energy. Ultimately, the article speaks to the danger of India’s continued use of coal as a power source (without pollution control) which could lead to an environmental disaster.

Mann’s discussion of the Jharia coalfield was especially enlightening. At one point, Mann notes that “It has been on fire, calamitously, since 1916” (182). This point indicates that the environment has been compromised by harmful levels of carbon emitted for a century.

After reading Man’s article, what was one point concerning emissions control that you found especially interesting? Briefly explain why and provide a page number citation.


59 comments:

Asher Denkyirah said...

"Energy from the sun today is responsible for about 1 percent of India's electricity" (187). Sometimes it is hard to believe how much that the sun provides for us in our lives'. India really seems to pushing the need for solar power electricity. From what I know, Japan is also a huge advocate for solar power. So, it's it good for India, which has a large population, to invest in shared solar power so that everyone can have electricity to some capacity.

Bianca w said...

One point concerning emissions control that was interesting to me was how all of the world's nations couldn't seem to agree on plans for India and their emissions. India demanded that rich nations pay for their costs of having big increases in solar and wind power projects(184). Why should other nations have to pay for these projects? India has to take part of the responsibility for keeping climate under control. Also, I understand India's side. Other nations are expecting them to catch up fast to industrialize but don't understand that over the years they used lots of fossil fuels so of course, India will have to use the same. The world's nations need to all come together to help India come up with an emissions plan.

Zaria Whitlock said...

There were multiple quotes that I found to be interesting; however, I believe the statement that best summed up the short essay was the last line of the short story. Mann writes, "India will make a choice, but it will not be India's alone" (Mann 194). I found this interesting because although India seems to be the largest up and coming country as far as population and the carbon output of the country, the decisions being made in the country while they affect India it is more important to understand that the decisions they make are affecting everyone.

Zaria W.

Aja J said...

One point I found interesting about emissions control was the emissions plan that was proposed. “It demanded rich nations pay for most of the cost, which it estimated to be at least $2.5 trillion,” (184). Its crazy to think that it would cost that much money. But then again, India has such a large population that it kind of makes sense.

Kyla Tinsley said...

Sometimes I forget that air pollution is an actual thing as I never lived in a place where such a thing is an issue, but this article and quote reminded me quickly: "Outdoor air pollution, most of it due to coal, is already responsible for 645,000 premature deaths a year... New Delhi, ringed by coal plants, is said to have the world's most polluted air. (190)" This reminded me that emissions control is incredibly important. People should not be dying because their air is not clean enough for them. India is trying to come up with an emissions plan, but with centuries of using coal and fossil fuels makes the transition difficult.

Kyla T.

JaLeah M . said...

When reading the prompt for this blog prior to reading the essay, I immediately thought I wonder how this massive amount of air pollution affects the health of India's population. So when reading the portion of the essay that states, "Outdoor air pollution, most of it due to coal, is already responsible for 645,000 premature deaths a year" (190) I found my answer. It's scary to think that in certain places of the world people must live with air that is dangerous/harmful to even breathe in. It certainly should be critical that those in power come together to find essential solutions to this problem.

Erica K. said...

One thing that was interesting to me is the quote, "energy from the sun today is responsible for about 1 percent of India's electricity." 1% may not sound like much but it just shows how much our environment and our solar system actually applies to our daily lives and our daily well being . 1% can actually go a long way when it comes to a whole country.

Kenisha Townsend said...

I found it really interesting how India is having a pollution problem that is caused by the West, according to Sunita Narain, yet the West aren't trying to assist India in fixing the problem (184). They continuously judge India for being behind in industrializing. Also, I am sure other nations are aware that India is poor considering its richest people are poorer than those in the West. If the West truly wants India to advance, then they will assist them in their efforts.

Aleeya Barrolle said...

A point concerning emissions control that I found especially interesting was about how the air pollution has affected the people. "Outdoor air pollution, most of it due to coal, is already responsible for 645,000 premature deaths a year, according to a study published in Nature; New Dhi, ringed by coal plants, is said to have the world's most polluted air (190).

Jaleelah Muhammad said...

On 183, Mann says that "India's Carbon output, by contrast, is growing faster than any other country's. should that trend continue... India could surpass China in 25 years to become the world's greatest emitter". This stood out to me because we've been socialized to think of countries like India to be impoverished or to resemble slums, so I never would have thought that anything in India could emit so much carbon. Especially not enough to one day surpass China.

Nia Piggott said...


I found the viewpoint and ideas that each area had on emission control to be interesting. The point that stood out to me was on page (84) where it states "officials and academics have long argued that western nations are demanding that India industrialized without burning even a fraction of the fossil fuel; that developed nations consumed when they industrialized." I say this because it is interesting and possibly contradicting how there is a push to prevent burning of fuels to industrialize India while those same fuels helped industrialize western society. On the other hand, I can understand the viewpoint of wanting to make changes after the learning the long-term consequences. It is going to be very difficult to align everyone's view on this topic, but I am curious to see how it will unfold.

Jasmine Williams said...

I found it interesting when page 194 says, "India will make a choice, but it will not be India's alone". To me, this statement is implying that there are more powerful countries, that decide the fate of other countries. India's decision to use coal without air pollution regulations has a consequence that effects more than just India.

Jasmine Williams

Paris Smith said...

The one comment that I found interesting was when Mann wrote, "India will make a choice, but it will not be India's alone" (Mann 194). A lot of big decisions that every country makes can sometimes affect their relationships with other countries as well. Even though they are one nation, they still have to think about everyone in other nations, which is the world. It is crazy how often we forget that all of our actions causes other reactions to occur and it's no different whether you're talking about individual actions or an entire nation.

Brianna Reed said...

I found it interesting that Modi is trying to expand India's renewable energy sources while simultaneously increasing output in the coal reserves which would displace nearly a million people (pg 185). How can you try to take measures to fix a problem while still resorting to the very measures that are creating that same issue? It seems like a futile mission. It's also interesting to think about what will happen on a global scale if things don't improve. I think as we live in another county far from where this is happening, we forget that eventually it will have a substantial impact on everyone everywhere.

Jeremiah Terrell said...

I found it interesting that many people in India see solar energy as second class, saying, "we want real electricity, not fake electricity"(page 193).This was interesting because there are 300 million people without power but some are being picky about what kind of power they want.

Crystal Rice said...

One point concerning emissions control that I found interesting was when the cost of capping greenhouse gases would be. The article states, "It also demanded rich nations pay for most of the cost, which is estimated...15 years," (184). The price for doing so is ridiculously high and crazy to even think about. Officials and academics in India have had long time conflict with Western nations who urged demanded that they industrialize their country without burning nearly as much fossil fuels developed nations have while transitioning to an industrial one. Sunita Narain, the director general of the Centre for Science and Environment in New Dehli expressed that it is all the West's fault for the Co2 in the air. In my opinion, if India knew they didn't have enough money to industrialize then they should've waited a little longer until they could cover the cost themselves. Other nations can't possibly have that much impact or control over them in making a big decision like that with that amount attached to it.

Kaelyn Blunt said...

The part that stuck out to me was "outdoor pollution, most of it due to coal, is already responsible for 645,000 premature deaths a year..." (190). This stuck out to me the most because while I knew of air pollution and the horrible consequences from it, I did not quite comprehend the amount of deaths that come from it. We always hear of the dangers and deaths, but never numbers. Never names. Together, we can lower the pollution done to the earth, but only if we recognize the repercussions of our actions.

Zuriah Harkins said...

I found several topics in this essay to be very interesting. But one that stood out to me most was on page 185 when Mann stated, "This strategy has a brutal downside: vastly increased carbon emissions that would make it nearly impossible to prevent global temperatures from rising more than 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, the goal of Paris talks." I feel like 3.6 degrees is a dramatic jump, especially since evidence of climate change is already so noticeable in our environment. It's especially interesting to me because it doesn't seem like a country should be allowed to intentionally and knowing increase the average temperature by that much. It goes to show that every country on the globe needs to come together and agree on how to improve our air quality.

-Zuriah Harkins

Donovan Washington said...

I found it interesting when the article was stating facts about the wealthy Indians compared to the wealthy Americans in the West. Then ends off the paragraph by stating, "Most of these people use kerosene for lighting and cook their food on wood or dung fires. The smoke kills about 1.3 million Indians a year, according to the World Health Organization" (Mann 184). I found this interesting because I have sympathy for the people that have to live in. Also this quote stands out to me because this shows just much need their is for a solution for the amount of people without electricity.

Andre Valentine said...

What blew me away was that on page 184 it says India wants 2,5 trillion dollars from other nations to help with emission control. Their huge population calls for high energy use, and by using so much coal they are polluting the air badly. Even though the air needs to be cleaned paying India 116 billion dollars a year is not good for other nations either.



-Andre Valentine

Brandon Nichols said...

Modi plans on using India's huge amount of coal reserves to power the country, which would make it impossible to prevent global temperatures from rising more than 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit (page 185). This is scary because over 300 million Indians lack electricity, and they need to get their power somehow. India would also be affected by the increase of temperature, since they already have little water supply and a hot climate. At the moment, I think they should look into nuclear power.

Brandon N

Sierra Taylor said...

China and India are top contributors to the emission of greenhouse gases. Given that their populations are some of the biggest on the planet, it's not a surprise. However, the United States is also included in that list. In the middle of page 183, the text says, "For years, attention has focused on the role of China, the largest emitter of greenhouse gases, and the United States, one of the largest per capita emitters." That speaks about the way of life for many Americans. Roughly, 320 million people live in the United States - not nearly as many people as China - yet we are one of the top emitters. The fact hints at American privilege because Americans are able to enjoy luxuries that people in other countries cannot. The lifestyles of the people that live in the United States play a role in our climate change today.

Tiera Williams said...

The quote that I found most interesting was on page 194. The text states, "India will make a choice, but it will not be India's alone." I found this quote interesting because it addresses that whatever decision India makes will not only impact India, but others as well. It also addresses how India's opinion will matter but, because of the financial assistance they'll need from other nations they will only have so much control.

Anonymous said...

What I found interesting was the amount of deaths per year due to pollution. "Outdoor air pollution, most of it due to coal, is already responsible for 645,000 premature deaths a year..." (p.190) I had always believed that most of the pollution deaths were sea animals. I thought this because I took where I grew up for granted and didn't think air pollution could kill so many people.

-Marcus Underwood

J'kolbe Kelly said...

I found Raju's major task to be very interesting. Page 182 states, "The Jharia coalfield where Raju works, is India's biggest and most significant, covering some 170 square miles. It has been on fire, calamitously, since 1916; entire villages have collapsed into the smoking ground." He is expected to stop a fire that has been raging for over a century. This also makes me worry because their use of coalfields is expected to go up as their economy grows.

Brandy Collier said...

One point that I found interesting was when it talked about the risks of doubling the coal output and how it affects the people that live in the area. On page 190 it states, "low-quality, highly polluting thermal coal. Outdoor air pollution, most of it due to coal, is already responsible for 645,000 premature deaths a year". The coal output that they are doubling will also decrease the population which would not be a good idea. If the coal is causing air pollution which is causing death then it is not safe to double the output.

-Brandy Collier

Deborrah B. said...

One of the points in the article that was interesting to me was when it said that India was planning to build 455 new coal fired electrical plants, giving them the most coal plants in the world (185). In the next paragraph it mentions that India is one of the countries that would be most effected by climate change because of their long coast line and already limited resources. Hopefully they will continue to invest in solar power so that will stop their productions of coal plants and
-Deborrah B.

Victoria Wright said...

One point in this article concerning emissions control that I found especially interesting was the fact that outdoor air pollution is responsible for 645,000 premature deaths a year(190). This is interesting to me because 90 percent of India's coal is highly-polluting and it is still used as one of the top energy sources.

Anonymous said...

One point concerning emissions control that I found interesting is in regards to its focus on India and how only 1 percent of energy from the sun is responsible for India’s electricity (page 187). This absolutely blows my mind especially for such a big area and large amount of people. We must do better at using our resources carefully and tap into the benefits of solar power for sustainability purposes.
Sandra Y.

Anonymous said...

(Sorry, didn't see the email for this. I need to clean my inbox.)

Something tells me that this entire book is going to be a constant reminder that we should start up a new planet but ban humans (and any animal rising to the mental level of humans) from it so it can actually remain stable for a good amount of time. My issue with this chapter in particular is what's illustrated on page 184 and onto 185. Air is not stagnant. It doesn't just chill in one spot and if you mess it up it's just for you to get back what you created. We ALL (non-human entities as well who have NOTHING to do with any of it) are forced to deal with "organized societies'" problems. I know we can easily put a dollar amount on human life in this world, but are we really putting a dollar amount on the entire world? Yes, the costs must come from somewhere, but if governments actually bothered to educate their population on what that cost is going to, I would think people would be willing to handle it. (If not then coercion is fine.) Just get the problem resolved.

-Que'rra Mason

Maya Searcy said...

On page 190 it says "Outdoor air pollution, most of it due to coal, is already responsible for 645,000 premature deaths a year, according to a study published in Nature; New Delhi, ringed by coal plants, is said to have the world's most polluted air" I know that air pollution is a thing and is negatively affecting people and their environments, however when I think air pollution I think the orange glow around cities that block out the stars. Sometimes I forget that air pollution is a much bigger problem than just an orange glow, it is affecting many people terribly. This shows how big of a problem air pollution really is and that just because it doesn't affect me so dramatically in my life doesn't mean that it isn't hurting someone else more.

Sydney Oats said...

"Outdoor air pollution, most of it due to coal, is already responsible for 645,000 premature deaths a year" (190). I actually take great interest in these type of things. Pollution that is causing illness, cancer, and death are all man made. With that being said, we have the power to stop producing the pollutants. It is sad that India has to experience this tragedy. There are many other resources that can be used today instead of coal, and they may want to make that transition soon before it gets worse.

Kytela Medearis said...

I have actually heard about this prior to reading this section of the book and was fascinated to learn more. I think the quote that strikes me the most is, "Outdoor air pollution, most of it due to coal, is already responsible for 645,000 premature deaths a year, according to a study published in Nature; New Dhi, ringed by coal plants, is said to have the world's most polluted air (190)." The fact that the air is SO polluted and is causing so many deaths, to no avail, is just absolutely preposterous. They are knowingly releasing pollution and cancers in the air and are doing nothing to prevent it. Even scarier is a quote from page 182, "It has been on fire, calamitously, since 1916.” This has been going on for over a century and there seems to be no end in site. I feel as if there is a need for a deeper look into the operation and why nothing is being done to change things.
-Kytela Medearis

Mike Dade said...

Out of all the facts that we're thrown at us in this article, the most intriguing and concerning fact had to be how much the pollution in India affects the health of those there. Mann states, "Outdoor air pollution, most of it due to coal, is already responsible for 645,000 premature deaths a year, according to a study published in Nature; New Dhi, ringed by coal plants, is said to have the world's most polluted air (190). The fact that this number can get this high and the country as a whole still doesn't pay much mind to it is very sad and off-putting. You'd think the well-being of citizens would trump any monetary amount, but it's a shame we live in a world where it doesn't.

Jordan R. said...

It's hard to think that something as simple as providing power-lines for a town could be so difficult for a government. On page 191 Mann describes a situation where a shop in a small town has use of electricity' "... a small girl crouches on the floor, doing homework in the pool of light... The extended hours, the ability to do homework after chores, the chance to an extra income-- all of it comes from a single light". I feel like this fact alone, the opportunity to give a family or business a chance to have a better life is more important than how hard it may be to put up power-lines.

Joshua Jones said...

One thing that really shocked me was the amount of deaths due to the smoke byproduct that "kills about 1.3 million Indians a year, according to the World Health Organization," (184). This relates to the two paths that Modi faces with how Indians will get energy, either coal or renewables. This whole dichotomy seems difficult because of the impact on Indian life. You would think since so many Indians die by smoke, they wouldn't have a hard choice choosing between coal and solar. I think this idea plays well on all of the world powers and is an important topic for us all to think about.

-Josh J.

Anonymous said...

This goes to show how uncertain things can be in this life. One thing that stood out to me on page 184 was that India felt as though they were cleaning up the West’s mistakes when it comes to climate change, which is keeping them from cutting back on the emission of greenhouse gases. Whether this is true or not, this should not stop them from trying to keep the planet healthy and free from harm.
-Jasmin S.
________________________________________

Anonymous said...

pg. 184
What was most interesting to me was the point that India made. They're trying to industrialize, but are being criticized for their emissions in doing so. Also, the same countries looking at india and judging them for poor use of their fossil fuels aren't trying to fund an alternative. It's a catch 22 in my eyes. Unless India can reach a feasible agreement with these other countries, the world will suffer. However, India is not to blame solely. Everyone has a responsibility to the environment and keeping our air clean.

Shelby W.

Anonymous said...

People don’t realize the significance of our nature light source, the sun. Large amount of coal and other fossils are use to supply electricity. "Energy from the sun today is responsible for about 1 percent of India's electricity" (187). People show utilize for of the natural sunlight to fuel electricity rather then use up a limited source of electric fuel.

I also feel it is interesting to note that people feel that solar energy is a second class thing. "we want real electricity, not fake electricity"(page 193). I’m unsure as to why energy from the sun is considered fake electricity
Tatyana C.

Breanna B. said...

Mann says, "Outdoor air pollution, most of it due to coal, is already responsible for 645,000 premature deaths a year" (Pg. 190). This is horrific. All the years of carbon emission has impacted the health of India's population. In such a heavily populated area, the people of India are suffering at the hands of the coal industry. Those at the head of the table MUST work toward a greener solution to energy needs.

Kathryn Hatches said...

"Outdoor air pollution, most of it due to coal, is already responsible for 645,000 premature deaths a year" (Page 90). This is absolutely terrifying. The most insane part of this whole equation is our own influence. It disgusts me that people still deny our destruction of our environment. Thanks for yet another article that makes me incredibly angry!
-Kathryn Hatches

Jazsmine Towner said...

"It also demanded rich nations pay for most of the cost, which it estimated to be 'at least 2.5 trillion'... between now and 2030, more than 166 billion a year for the next 15 years". This is interesting to me because I never knew that this issue would be so expensive. The cost is way more than the average person can imagine. And it's also interesting because each nation would be put in debt because of this problem. It leads me to think: If this costs 166 billion a year to fix, what corners will they cut to account for the losses? Education? Welfare? Etc.
-Jazsmine Towner

Marcus Barnes said...

One thing that stood out to me after reading this was the fact of how many premature deaths are caused by air pollution. The article mentions, "outdoor air pollution, most of it due to coal, is already responsible for 645,000 premature deaths a year." That is unacceptable and outrageous. We definitely need to change the fact that coal is the leading source of energy and replace it with something less harmful and better for the environment.

~ Marcus Barnes

Olivia S said...

Solar energy is a big topic in environmental sciences. "Energy from the sun today is responsible for about 1 percent of India's electricity" (187); this is unacceptable. Reading this sentence of the passage was disheartening. There have been studies that explain how we have the technology to power the entire planet using a small fraction of Africa's land mass for solar energy panels. Readings such as these need to be more widespread so that awareness can be drawn to the need for clean energy. India should be able to have 100% of their electricity being powered by the sun.

Peyton D. said...

The statement I found the most interesting was on page 192 that said, "Even if India floods the sky with coal smoke, the 300 million Indians without power still might not get connected-the worst of all possible worlds." The Indian government proposed expanding it's solar power resources along with doubling coal production in order to give more Indian people electricity. Due to limited resources, they quietly abandoned the renewable energy plan and are turning to coal even though it destroys the environment. In my opinion, the use of coal can possibly be justified if people are given electricity but due to limitations there is no guarantee that will even make a difference.

A. Robinson said...

One point concerning India's environment that was especially concerning to me was the quote, "outdoor pollution, most of it due to coal, is already responsible for 645,000 premature deaths a year..." (190). It has already had such a huge impact on India's environment and people are dying everyday due to these excess carbon emissions. I had no idea that this was going on but in my opinion, it should be considered an international crisis. India needs help.
-Alexis R.

Alexis Acoff said...

On page 183, the author mentioned that India will become what the United States imagined China was in the 1990's. Unlike the United States and China, India does not emit greenhouse gases on the level that the others do. This country is on the rise for being a power-country due to its growing carbon output!

Jazmyn Maggitt said...

“India will make a choice, but it will not be India’s alone” (193). This point just shows that larger countries have the power to make influential decisions that effect a lot more people than just their own. I know that the US has been one of these countries in the past but now it looks like India is making one of the most important decisions for the well-being of the planet. All that can be done now is for everyone to try to lower the use of coal and increase the use of solar power.

Robert Craig Jr said...

I think we need to focus a lot more of our attention on India while still pressuring China to reduce greenhouse emissions. "For years, attention has focused on the role of China, the largest emitter of greenhouse gases, and the United States, one of the largest per capita emitters." However, this will be difficult because India is significantly poorer than China.

Shardai J-H. said...

ON quote that stood out to me regarding India's emissions control was, “it demanded rich nations pay for most of the cost, which it estimated to be at least $2.5 trillion,” (184). Initially I would think that it is India's responsibility to fix their wrongdoings. However, with a country that has as many people and as much carbon pollution as India, then it is every nation's responsibility to ensure safe conditions for the planet.

Xavier Morrison-Wallace said...

It was interesting to find out that India is having a pollution problem although the western nations developed nations burn through alot more fossil fuels(184). It is easy to see that India is behind on their industrialization and is not an advanced country. Instead of judging the country, our attention should be more focused on underdeveloped countries such as India, but their emissions plan was pretty expensive. I think it is easy for western nations to ignore issues such as emissions in underdeveloped nations such as India.

Kelsey W said...

I thought it was interesting how China is lowering there carbon emission amount by so much but India is working to increase their emissions by most likely just as much (p.183). It is great what China is doing, but now it seems like India may be getting power hungry since they are growing so much and they look at the US and China and sort of envy them. I'm sure it will continue to happen the more countries continue to develop, but let's just hope they find new, more energy-conserving ways.

Anonymous said...

"Outdoor air pollution, most of it due to coal, is already responsible for 645,000 premature deaths a year..." (p.190). What I found most interesting is the amount of deaths caused by air pollution. Being a science major, you hear about pollution a lot but they don't talk about human deaths due to air pollution. I would think that their was only a few deaths due to air pollution but to know their are thousands of people who have died from this problem is devastating.

Fiona Hill.

John Kriha said...

One point concerning emissions control that stood out to me was on pg. 184 “the West is asking us to pay for its mistakes. They are saying ‘oh you’re a rich country now, you can cover the cost’.” The West has emitted a major carbon input during the industrial revolution. Now that India is going through its own revolution, it wouldn’t be fair to place the fault solely on them.

Carlie Bibbs said...

One point from Mann’s article concerning India’s greenhouse gas emissions was how much pollution there is in the air and how it causes so many potential health risks. On page 190, Mann discussed how thousands of premature deaths are due to the outdoor air pollution. It saddens me that we live in a world where babies are dying before they have even had a chance to try and live. Due to the high concentrations of greenhouse gases, it is extremely hard for India to even reduce the pollution. Therefore, millions of people will still continue to die each year.
-Carlie Bibbs

Carlie Bibbs said...

One point from Mann’s article concerning India’s greenhouse gas emissions was how much pollution there is in the air and how it causes so many potential health risks. On page 190, Mann discussed how thousands of premature deaths are due to the outdoor air pollution. It saddens me that we live in a world where babies are dying before they have even had a chance to try and live. Due to the high concentrations of greenhouse gases, it is extremely hard for India to even reduce the pollution. Therefore, millions of people will still continue to die each year.
-Carlie Bibbs

Cheniya A. said...

The most interesting point in this article, for me, was the emission control plan that was proposed. India demanded that, "rich nations pay for most of the cost, which it estimated to be at least $2.5 trillion” (Mann 184). This is a bit inconsiderate, but if everyone were follow the plan, I could see more wealthy countries paying a higher percentage.
On the other hand, it's mind boggling to even think that the plan would cost this much in only one country. I understand India trying to lighten their carbon footprint, but I kind of feel that it's all or nothing. Other countries like China need this treatment too.




One point I found interesting about emissions control was the emissions plan that was proposed. “It demanded rich nations pay for most of the cost, which it estimated to be at least $2.5 trillion,” (184). Its crazy to think that it would cost that much money. But then again, India has such a large population that it kind of makes sense.

De'Abrion Joyner said...

One interesting thing I found pretty interesting in the on emissions on page 184 there is a struggle between India and the rest of the nations on how much of the cost India should shoulder to keep emissions lower. Although India knows that their emissions are growing they took the stance that they didn’t pollute the world thus far and I can understand why they would feel that they shouldn’t have to pay for other nations mistakes.

De’Abrion Joyner

Anonymous said...

The aspect of this article that I found the most interesting is that India will be the most emitting country. This aspect surprised me the most because when you think of the countries with the top ANYTHING, it is usually the United States, Russia, or China. India never comes to mind. “…India could surpass China in 25 years to become the world’s greatest emitter”(183). Lyric B.