Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Haley Reading Group: “Why Are Sports Bras So Terrible?”


[The Best American Science and Nature Writing (2016)]

Cynthia A. Campbell

Rose Eveleth’s article “Why Are Sports Bras So Terrible?” focuses on the problems associated with creating comfortable sports bras. Eveleth illuminates the evolution of sports bras. Ultimately, the article speaks to the original purposes of sports bras—to provide support and comfort for breasts during exercise and while participating in sports—and how that has changed because of the fashion industry.

Eveleth’s discussion of breast-science workshops was especially enlightening. At one point, Eveleth notes that "representatives [of different brands] learn ways bras can be designed to help reduce pain" (49). This point indicates that scientific research of sports bras is as influential as the fashion industry’s marketing.

After reading Eveleth’s article, what was one point concerning how sports bras are developed or advertised that found especially intriguing? Why? Please provide a page number citation.

65 comments:

Mikaela S said...

One point concerning how sports bras are developed that I found especially intriguing can be found on page 47. In the passage, the author states, "White thinks that in the near future, they'll be using something called inertial sensors - tiny sensors that can be placed directly on the breast itself to gather GPS and acceleration data". I never realized how much work goes into developing bras and it is interesting to see the possible plans of the future.

J'kolbe Kelly said...

The area of Sports bra development that intrigued me most was presented when they are talking about the evolution of the corset. In 1887 they said woman were "repeatedly stabbed by the metal and whale bone stays of the cumbersome garment." This surprises me because on the same page it said sports corsets didn't show up for another 24 years in 1911.

Donovan Washington said...

In the text Eveleth describes the downsides for women that can come from wearing an ill-fitting bra, "Studies have shown that breast discomfort in a leading reason women stop participating in sports. And in extreme cases, an ill-fitting bra can actually do nerve damage" (46). I am intrigued by this because up until now I never knew how serious wearing a sports bra is for woman. I especially didn't know that a sports bra could cause a women a nerve damage even if it doesn't fit her well.
-Donovan Washington

Zaria Whitlock said...

I found what Eveleth stated on page 51 to be interesting, "Lawson or White or any bra designer could, tomorrow, invent the world's best sports bra... But if that sports bra isn't cute, it wouldn't matter" (Eveleth p. 51). I found this interesting because I personally disagree and agree at the same time. I do believe women search for attractive sports bras but I also believe that if the "world's best sports bra" were to be invented tomorrow everyone women would want to have one simply because of the support the bra would provide. In the end if the bra wasn't cute I do not believe women would completely disregard the bra I just believe women would buy a more attractive bra to wear on top of the other.
Zaria W.

Asher said...

When I think of sports bras I think of durability when working our or when a woman doesn't want to feel the underwire of a regular bra. I do think it's a little odd that many retail companies (Victoria Secret for example) promotes such fashionable bras which only dilutes their actual practicality. Sports bras should be used to support a woman's breasts and not just be worn to look good. I think on page 51, the quote "to be everything at once" really alludes to my previous words. Why can't women wear sports bras for their actual use? Why has society convinced women that they can't be practical but only fashionable?

- Asher Denkyirah

Sierra Taylor said...

The passage that stood out to me the most was the ending paragraph on page 51 through page 52 that states,"And therein lies the problem. Lawson or White or any bra designer could, tomorrow, invent the world's best sports bra. Something comfortable and supportive and soft and easy to put on and take off...But if that sports bra isn't cute, it wouldn't matter." Some people place greater importance on style than being comfortable. I think this applies to more types of clothing than bras. Shoes is definitely a big category.

Kenisha Townsend said...

I found it especially intriguing how much time and thought goes into designing a sports bra to try to make it comfy and attractive. In the text it was mentioned how females want something that not only fits good but looks good as well (pg.51). The pretty bras adhered to the idea that beauty is pain, in which I believe is old-fashioned and out-dated in this century. However, stylish sports bras do normally prevail over those that aren't whether they are comfortable or not. I never considered the difficulty in designing a sports bra that fits all checkpoints.

Xavier Jefferson said...

The section that I found most intriguing was on page 47. I thought the methods used for gathering data on women who are physically active were very intuitive and potentially life changing. Page 47 talks about sensors being used to gather data on movement while women work out, but the passage also states that the sensor technology wasn't quite there yet, so I found it interesting that this research is pushing the limits of current sensor technology to better understand these problems women face.

-Xavier Jefferson

Joshua Jones said...

On page 50, the author quotes Lawson when she mentions that there are more products from 'nonathletic brands that don't have the structure and the design to meet women's needs..' This linked me to the beginning of the essay where the author stated that a sports corset was not even made until 1911 and a sports bra until 1977. I thin that it is wrong to capitalize on people's pain without even trying to solve the issue. This specific example is opulent in exemplifying the "business" of the world.

Josh J.

Anonymous said...

I found the statistics about women not wearing the right size bra to be interesting: "A full 75 percent of the marathon runners White talked to had some kind of bra problem during training. ...Bra sizing is confusing, imprecise, and variable. (47)" I found this interesting that, as a woman, I myself find bra sizing to be confusing and often times deceiving. This has led me to wear bras that were not my size, causing me discomfort and pain. If bra sizing were more accurate, there may be an increase in demand for them.

-Kyla T.

Jordan R. said...

In the very last paragraph of the article, there is a comment made that concludes the text as a whole, "But if the sports bra isn't cute, it wouldn't matter... It's based on fashion and look. And that's what sells" (52). I feel that this statement is interesting because it seems to contradict all of the previous information in the article. For women with larger breasts, a good sports bra (or bra alone) is very hard to come by. So for women in that situation, I feel that the "fashion" of a bra does not matter! As long as it is supportive and comfortable in the right ways then it is suitable.

Nia Piggott said...

I found this article to be very interesting. I never thought about the history of bras and sports bras or how much research takes place in order to create a great product. A particular quote that stood out to me was on page 51/52 that stated " Something comfortable and supportive and soft and easy to put on and take off. Something that wicks away the sweat.. but if it isn;t cute it doesn't matter it's based on a fashion look and that's what sells." This stood out to me because even if they find something that fits all the structural needs if it is not appealing it won't be advertised because the looks are the most important.

Aleeya Barrolle said...

In the article "Why Are Sports Bras So Terrible" the writer Rose Eveleth was able to teach me information about sports bras that I had never heard before. The most interesting part was the history of the past and the present of the sports bra. "Finally, in 1977 - the same year Victoria's Secret was founded - the sports bra as we know it was invented by Lisa Lindahl and Polly Smith, with the help of designer and runner Hinda Miller. That first sports bra was simply two jockstraps sewn together" (44).

Aleeya B.

Brandy Collier said...

On page 48, LaJean Lawson states, "There is no piece of clothing that is more difficult to design well than a sports bra". I found this intriguing because I was not aware that sports bras were very difficult to make. I thought they were easier to create than regular bras. While reading the article I found out that there is a lot of work that goes into creating a good bra and I didn't know that it was that much work or that there was an entire process in place in order to create sports bras.

Aja J said...

One point from this article that I found interesting about sports bras is how they can affect performance. “Over the course of a marathon you might start seeing changes in patterns of running. You’re probably going to see a decrease in stride levels. You’re just not performing as well as you could,” (46). It’s just crazy to imagine that a sports bra can have that much of an affect on someone’s performance while they are running or doing other strenuous activities. I definitely would have never guessed that would happen just from not choosing or having the right sports bra.

Brianna Reed said...

The quote that caught my attention reads " A bra can't just be good, it also has to be fashionable and womanly.....and when forced to choose between those two thing, bra manufacturers almost invariably choose look over function" (51). As someone who almost always feels discomfort when wearing bras I found this to be discouraging. Sports bras are significantly more comfortable than the standard underwire, but this quote reminded me that our society always focuses on aesthetic and how things look. As consumers we are drawn to things that please us visually and things like comfort always tend to be overshadowed.

Maya Searcy said...

On page 51 it says how a designer could make the worlds best sports bra but if it isnt cute it doesn't matter. This stuck out to me because it shows how much bra designers and women have changed from wanting support vs wanting something cute. I even find myself looking for a cute sports bra rather than one that really works.

Gabrielle Wimes said...

The most intriguing section of this part of the book was when the article touched upon the downsides for women who happen to wear a bra that doesn't fit quite right. The book reads, "Studies have shown that breast discomfort is the leading reason women stop participating in sports. And in extreme cases, an ill-fitting bra can actually do nerve damage" (page 46). This was very interesting to me as I have never thought of the serious affects that a bra could cause some one. Also for me personally I never particularly thought of a bra to be ill fitting as it could've been.

Peyton D. said...

The point that I found interesting is that advertising is steering women away from bras that scientifically are better for them. On page 50 and 51, the author explains that Victoria's Secret has an advertising campaign with the goal to eliminate the uniboob problem created by straight across bras. In reality, the uniboob bras have been shown to reduce motion and breast pain more than the Victoria's Secret designer bras. Women would rather have sexual appeal than have a functional or comfortable bra.

Deborrah B. said...

On page 48 Lajean Lawson states, "There is no piece of clothing that is more difficult to design well than a sports bra." She then lists off parameters that are needed like support, straps, slippage, and looking cute which she says are conflicting design requirements. Being a female athlete, a lot of the things she listed here are important for sports bras, other than them looking cute. I think that manufacturers and designers are too focused on making sports bras look cute instead of making them comfortable. Recently, there has been more focus on bras that offer comfort, so hopefully this trend will continue.
Deborrah B.

Jasmine Williams said...

The most interesting thing about sports bra development is the amount and intensity of research that goes into it. Page 46 explains that they use "3-D scannings, ultrasounds, and devices that measure the skin to really better understand the structure of the breasts". I had no idea that so much thought, time, and work went into designing sports bras.

Jasmine Williams

Marcus Barnes said...

One thing that stood out to me while reading this was the fact of how important sports bras were for women. I never realized or ever had a reason to even think about the importance of sports bras for female athletes. This passage, "Studies have shown that breast discomfort in a leading reason women stop participating in sports. And in extreme cases, an ill-fitting bra can actually do nerve damage,” (46) shows the effects a bad or poorly-made sports bra can have on a female athlete. They need to be made the best they can and most effective to allow women to have the chance to enjoy playing sports and other recreational activities comfortably.

- Marcus B.

Jasmin Smoot said...

When I first seen the title of the article, I knew it would be interesting. As a woman, of course I paid immediate attention to the reading. What shocked me the most was the beginning of the article. That’s the proper way to catch someone’s attention. On the bottom of page 45, the author discussed some findings through the University of Portsmouth about breast motion. I did not even know there was a such thing as a study of breast motion. It was just nice to hear about things like this.
-Jasmin Smoot

Andre Valentine said...

I was caught by how Jenny White tested over 1300 people's breast movement in the London.(46) Being a male i haven't had to deal with any struggles of having breast, yet many of the women's performances were hindered due to breast pain. I just never thought that breast were so sensitive to physical activity. If White's research is correct. I believe it is vital that a proper sports bra is constructed. This pain can lead to nerve damage and possibly obesity. This book yet again opened up another problem I was unaware of.

-Andre Valentin

Sandra Yokley said...

One point concerning how sports bras are developed or advertised that I found intriguing were the endless dimensions that now need to be considered because of society. On page 45,it says "standing in the way of designing the best sports bra possible is millennia of stigma, powerful marketing forces, and good old-fashioned physics." I find it sad that we've become so dependent upon the approval of the public that we are willing to sacrifice health.

Anonymous said...

Although I am not an athlete, I have a passion for working out. I spend a lot of my days in the gym and usually wearing a sports bra. To me sports bras are comfortable because I am not super developed that my breasts make it difficult to workout, but I know that there are several bustier females that sometimes have to wear two sports bras to get the right supports with absolutely no comfort."Studies have shown that breast discomfort in a leading reason women stop participating in sports" (45). The involvement of women in sports is a big step for feminism. Woman are a prominent part of the sports world. They should have the same comfort as any male would while performing.

Naomi Olsson

Sydney Oats said...

"Studies have shown that breast discomfort in a leading reason women stop participating in sports. And in extreme cases, an ill-fitting bra can actually do nerve damage" (46). For me personally I hate when a sports bra does not give the correct amount of support while participating in my sports, and working out. However I did not know that not wearing the correct size sports bra can cause damage that serious. I think that women should have more education how how to find a the best bra for them

-Sydney Oats

Olivia Slater said...

Page 47: "tiny sensors that can be placed directly on the breast itself to gather GPS and acceleration data".
I found this to be a bit ridiculous. Although I see the advantage, it seems unnecessary to have all of this extra fluff for a sports bra. When I am playing sports, I do not want to sweating all over a GPS chip. The passage did, however, open my eyes to the limitless possibilities of technology.

Kaelyn Blunt said...

While reading this, a lot stuck out to me. However, the most impactful for me was, "[s]tudies have shown that breast discomfort is the leading reason women stop participating in sports (Page 46). This made me stop because I was so relieved that I was not the only one who felt this way. I used to play basketball and soccer, but once it came to multiple practices each week, I simply could not take it anymore. I stopped playing, and when I explained why, people just didn't seem to accept that as a viable reason. Now that there is proof, I feel validated in a way. People need to understand that regular bras are not comfortable. I lived in a very sheltered town, so the talk of bras was shallow. However, once I found out about sports bras, I was disappointed that I had to quit because of something so ridiculous. Sports bras are great and I hope women out there do not feel less than for feeling the same way.

-Kaelyn Blunt

Jeremiah T said...

I was most intrigued when I read about what goes into designing the sports bras. "There is no piece of clothing more difficult to design well than a sports bra"(48). The designers have to worry about how well it performs, how it looks, it's comfort, and how it affect's different body types. I didn't realize bras had such an impact on women in sports and physical activity.

-Jeremiah Terrell

JaLeah M . said...

The portion on page 51-52 that reads about how even if the world's best sports bra was invented, if it wasn't cute it wouldn't sell... I disagree with this because I feel in today's day and age the importance of fitness and women working out is becoming increasingly prevalent. I think majority of the time sports bras are worn for comfort. Women who actually indulge in sports especially, I feel would purchase the world best, despite how it looks but because of what it is.

Anonymous said...

The part that was the most intriguing to me was when the author mentioned the importance of a good fitting bra. They wrote, "Studies have shown that breast discomfort in a leading reason women stop participating in sports. And in extreme cases, an ill-fitting bra can actually do nerve damage"(46). It is absolutely crazy to me, as a woman, about how important a good fitting bra is. Its too easy to just buy. Cheap sports bra and go with it, but this whole essay showed how important it is to make aure you are fully supported. Even when it comes to regular bras, I know a lot of women who have trouble finding the correct size which leads to issues as well. I believe peope who wear bras need to be better educated on the importance of getting the right size and fit!

-Kytela Medearis

Kathryn Hatches said...

The author writes about one of the many downsides to wearing a bra that's the wrong size (which most women unfortunately do). She writes, "studies have shown that breast discomfort in a leading reason women stop participating in sports" (Page 46). This makes me angry because simply having breasts should not be a deterrent from playing sports, a male-dominated field. It shows the blatant sexism that exists in the companies who make sports bras, who are more concerned with the bra being cute instead of doing its purpose.
-Kathryn Hatches

Jaleelah Muhammad said...

What I found most interesting was on pages 50-51 where the author discusses Victoria's Secret's battle against the uniboob. "Today, V.S. is continuing the war against compressed breasts. They call this "the uniboob". V.S.'s chief executive officer Sharen Jester Turne announced last year that the war against the uniboob was in full force..." (50). The author refutes the officer claim by stating that "sometimes the uniboob is in fact the best way to reduce breast motion and pain. Many women are constantly being told that even their sports bra should be sexy" (51). In a world where everything we think, do, say or wear is hypersexualized, it becomes difficult to live in comfort anymore. It almost feels like we are going back to the days of unbreathable corsets and pinchy shoes all in order to assure that our appearance is that of an attractive and desired individual. When will the madness end?

Natasha said...

I found page 50 to be very intruguing. Specifically, the section where the author mentions nonathletic companies who make sports bras basically knowing they do not provide adequate support for intense workouts, however, they do know they will make a profit because the bra itself is attractive. For me personally, I rate importance of support for sports bras a 9/10 compared to style only a 1/10. If you don't give your breasts enough support and wear a snug, durable bra at the gym, your breasts are honestly more likely to get smaller when you lose weight! That sounds crazy, but it's true. Women often compain about their breat size decreasing while losing weight and while this is typically inevitable, a proper sports bra will minimize this!

Paris Smith said...

What I found interesting was on page 51, where it said "Lawson or White or any bra designer could, tomorrow, invent the world's best sports bra... But if that sports bra isn't cute, it wouldn't matter". I can agree to that statement to an extent because yes I like my bras to be cute and comfy because it is important but when I wear a sports bra, it is usually to go to the gym where no one is going to see it anyway, so it doesn't really matter to me what the bra looks like because no one is going to see it but me and when you're at the gym, you are hot and sweaty anyway, so what should it matter if your bra is just one color?

Jazsmine Towner said...

I find it especially intriguing that women are being sexualized for their sports bras when in actuality the sports bra is supposed to be used for comfort and durability. In the text it states, "The uniboob is in fact the best way to reduce breast motion and pain. But women are constantly being told that even their sports bra should be sexy... Women feel like they have to present themselves in the best possible breasted way that will appeal sexually" (51). This is intriguing to me because women are more focused on being objectified sexually than getting a good sports bra that fulfills the needs of their exercise regimes, in my opinion, that is completely ridiculous being that there are plenty of other ways to have sex appeal.

Mike Dade said...

One part that caught my eye concerning the development of sports bras came on page 47; in the text, the author says, "White thinks that in the near future, they'll be using something called inertial sensors - tiny sensors that can be placed directly on the breast itself to gather GPS and acceleration data." (47) This passage stuck out to me because I didn't really understand the point of GPS within a bra, nonetheless, it's interesting to see how much technology plays a role in our lives, and I'm curious to see where else they might go with technological advances within clothing.

-Mike Dade

Anonymous said...

I don't have the book with me so I can't do direct quotes and page references..

I found it actually shocking that so much effort is being put into bras considering our male driven societies. So that was a nice read to get insight on the bra endeavor. I already knew most women didn't wear the right bras, but I thought that was more of a lack of knowledge of bras, rather than a matter of bras just not always being designed properly. It's interesting that such a simply structured body part creates so much distress in women. It seems like we are headed in the right direction with the sensor development in order to learn more about breast.

-Querra Mason

Crystal Rice said...

One point I found concerning the development of sports bras that was intriguing to me was the breast researcher and consultant for Champion, LaJean Lawson said, "There are so many different parameters. It't the most hooked-into cultural stereotypes. You have to think about sweat, support, chafing, straps, slippage, and the looking cute. That's really a long list of conflicting design requirements," (48). This quote was so intriguing to me because it really is hard to find a cute sports bra that does actually fit just right and hold us women like it is supposed to/how we would like it to. Most times women just get a sports bra because it is cute and disregard all of the other factors that they should be paying more attention to, such as support, and end up with a bra that is not cute at all because it isn't made for them.

Crystal R.

Nyla Gantt said...

Sports bras... "Pink", "Nike", "Adidas", and many more. These companies have made sports bras very popular for women. On page 51, the quote "to be everything at once" really appeals to me. In my opinion, Sports bras were made for fashion. Society has decided that sports bras are made to "contain" womens' body parts. Although this is one purpose, it isn't the sole purpose. Some women just want to be fashionable.
- Nyla Gantt

Brandon Nichols said...

"They're cultural objects, they're fashion objects, and as such they're laden with all kinds of baggage about how a woman is supposed to look." (50) This line stood out to me because as a male I never viewed bras this way. I never knew that the process of picking out a sports bras was so complicated. Now it makes sense why the sports bra industry is so profitable. It is basically like makeup.

Trevon Bosley said...

I was intrigued by the entire article ,but the history of sports bras is what truly caught my attention.On page 44 it states," In ancient Rome , women bound their breasts with cloth an leather." I had no idea just how old sports bras truly are and the history that made them come to be.

Breanna B. said...

"To be everything at once" (page 51). This is such a dynamic quote. Not only do sports bras serve a function with the benefit of being appealing to the eye, a woman herself must have a purpose while still being appealing to the eye. The women's clothing industry has taken advantage of the long-lasting effects of an old society in which women were for looking at. The sports bra industry is not innocent; I find it appalling that women have been coerced into buying products not for their function, but for their visual appeal--a chance to be beautiful in the eyes of society.

Anonymous said...

One point in this article that intrigued me was how much research and dedication is put into building the perfect sports bra for women. For example, researchers have women come into their labs to perform in sports bras just to figure out how the sports bras can be made to help athletes excel at their sport(Eveleth 46). This was outstanding to me because as a woman, I never put much thought into the making of the articles of clothing I wear, while there are people out there trying to make it perfect just for me.

Victoria Wright

H. Rambsy said...

"'repeatedly stabbed by the metal and whale bone stays of the cumbersome garment.' this quote was so interesting yo me because it shoes me what women had to go through. The pressure that is placed on women to look a certain way, and the uncomfortable products women have to use at times seem to be more troubling than things men have to use." --Aliyah Johnson

Anonymous said...

Studies have shown that breast discomfort in a leading reason women stop participating in sports. And in extreme cases, an ill-fitting bra can actually do nerve damage" (46). This passage stood out to me because I know a lot of girls that quit sports in high school because they weren’t able to find adequate bras. I also didn’t know that Ill fitting bras cause nerve damage. I knew that the hurt and left marks but I didn’t realize how severe it could get.

Tatyana Curtis

John Kriha said...

One point concerning how sports bras are developed that stood out to me was all the technology involved with designing the bras. An example of this can be found on page 46" we use 3d scanning, ultrasounds and devices that measure the skin.." and on page 47 "White thinks that in the near future, they'll be using something called internal sensors- tiny sensors that can be placed directly on the breast itself to gather GPS and acceleration data." This is outstanding to me because we will eventually reach a point where woman can go to a store and get bras custom made.

A. Robinson said...

I found it especially interesting thatthe text mentioned how women want something that not only fits good but is attractive to wear (pg.51). This idea is one commonly held by women and it just baffles me because it isn't true. It is interesting that some women are willing to go through a day of pain for something that would be covered up by a shirt anyway.

Anonymous said...

On page 47, "If the bra is too big, or has padding or anything else that might make it move anything else that might make it move differently from how the breast itself is moving, the researchers will be able to detect that." I thought this was interesting because I never thought of using technology for that sort of reason before.


-Marcus U.

YaQkeha Witherspoon said...

I thought it was kind of funny that this article was about bras because and me and my friends were just discussing issues concerning bras. The biggest issue that we all had was ill fitting bras due to wrong sizing at Victoria Secret. How can one find a good quality bra if they do not know their bra size. So, I found this snippet very interesting: "Bra sizing is confusing, imprecise, and variable. This isn't just a sports bra problem, either; some surveys say that literally 100 percent of women are wearing the wrong size bra" (Page 47). That is ridiculous. I think that I agree with the book's suggestion of throwing the whole sizing system away, and starting over.

Anonymous said...

Overall I am shocked how much care and research goes into sports bras. But the sports bra was invented in 1998 and we still use the same kind of bra to do this day. Over the years I haven't noticed much change within different sports bra. It's an issue many women have, but there doesn't seem to be much of a solution yet. But, on page 47 they mentioned the use of inertial sensors, which is directly placed on the breasts and gathers information directly. With this new experiment, it could change the sports bra world for women. It can give correct information and help scientists create the correct kind of sports bras.

Sydney J.

Anonymous said...

On page 46 they talk a lot about early research done for comfort and use of sports bras. What intrigued me though, was the amount of detail they have to pay attention to to understand how well their product was working for them. They use 3D scans, ultrasounds and also things that measured the skin on the breast. Having to go through so much to properly make these sports bras is pretty interesting.

- De'Abrion Joyner

Robert Craig Jr said...

What stood out to me in this piece is the bit about trackers potentially being put inside of training bras. "White thinks that in the near future, they'll be using something called inertial sensors - tiny sensors that can be placed directly on the breast itself to gather GPS and acceleration data." Even though this is reminiscent of how our phones and smart watches work, it seems excessive and creepy to put trackers inside a bra.

Bryce Barker said...

What stood out to me was On page 50 when it says the sports bras aren't another piece of sports equipment designed for maximum functionality. I found this intriguing because it never occurred to me that mass producing sports bras is harder than mass producing any other form of equipment because it every woman is shaped differently and one bra won't feel the same way on the another woman of the same size. This made me realize that a huge amount of work has to be put into this area of sports wear to make sure women feel comfortable.

Anonymous said...

In the article "Why Are Sports Bras So Terrible", I thought it was interesting how much effort is put into making and designing sports bras. Often times I don't think women even buy them based on all of the different characteristics and benefits that they offer but I think they purchase them based on their appearance as it mentions in the book on page 51.

- Carlie Bibbs

Tiera Williams said...

I really enjoyed reading this article. The point I found most interesting is all of the things that have to be considered when designing a sports bra. On page 48 the text states, "You have to think about sweat, support, chafing, straps, slippage and then looking cute. That's a really long list of conflicting design requirements." It's a lot to consider. The article also addresses the point of how fashionable the bra is is becoming the most important variable when it should be other factors in my opinion. For that reason they mention how the materials used to produce bras are more likely to be the focus for while and not the foundation of the bra itself. It sounds like it could be a few more years until solutions that work for everyone are found

Tiera W.

Fiona Hill said...

The most intriguing part of the text I found was found on page 51. The author said, " A bra can't just be good, it also has to be fashionable and womanly.....and when forced to choose between those two thing, bra manufacturers almost invariably choose look over function" (51). I found this to be the most interesting because it is very true. There are a lot of bras on the market nowadays that are just meant to be fashionable- they are not supportive and they end up breaking or being worn down very quickly. And these are the ones that are the most expensive. I also didn't think this much thought was put into making and designing bras.

Jazmyn Maggitt said...

The paragraph that ends in "bra manufacturers almost invariably choose look over function" (51).This stood out to me because the whole purpose of a bra is its function. The look is what might initially draw a person in but if it doesn't wear the right way the odds of a woman buying that bra again are very slight. This kind of goes back to prove that people don't really care about how these bra effect the women wearing them, they just want to expand their bottom line. Proper support is a necessity especially when one is moving around like they do when they work out and if you wear a tank top or a t-shirt to work out the look of the bra is irrelevant.

Cheniya A. said...

One point I found to be especially intriguing concerning the advertisement of sports bras reads as follows, "Lawson or White or any bra designer could, tomorrow, invent the world's best sports bra... But if that sports bra isn't cute, it wouldn't matter" (Eveleth 51). It is shocking to realize to because society, as a whole, places so much emphasis on the appearance of women that women would rather go for the “cuter”, more ill-fitting bra as opposed to one that promises great support.
What is more shocking, it doesn’t surprise me. Because as a girl, I can understand this decision and its weight. How appearance surpasses comfort even when it comes to health and deeply society ingrains this message resonated with me.

Kelsey W said...

I found it intriguing how much work actually goes into the design of sports bras. They are obviously very important for the pain that they may cause and also the debate of the health issues associated with bras. It is shocking to me that so many women would sacrifice comfort for style and fashion. On 52 the author wrapped up by giving all the functions that a sports bra should have and then saying that if the sports bra isn't cute though, none of that matters. In my opinion these fashion companies promote society to go along with this whole "cute" idea and in the end that makes these large companies more money.

Anonymous said...

After completing the reading, I reflected on some major points of interest. Wha stuck out to me the most was just how complex it is to design one. The factors that must be considered are plentiful and sometimes compete with one another. I've never worn one because my breasts are too big, so I think, to be adequately supported without cups and wiring. If I were too, though, it seems that may be an even more strenuous process. (p.47)
--Shelby W.

Bianca w said...

One point to me that was intriguing was that women pay more attention to how the bra looks then how comfortable it makes them. This is the reason why companies like Victoria Secret advertise their bras to be sexually appealing.On Page 51 Jaime Schultz, a sociologist who studies women and bras, said that " Women feel like they have to present themselves in the best possible breasted way. that will appeal sexually. Why do women feel the need to look cute while exercising or playing a sport? Men don't have to worry about being sexually appealing while playing sports.

Dakarai P. said...

What I found to be the most interesting is despite major advanced in technology and health we still don't really understand how breast move or what the best way to support them is. I think this is because up until a few decades ago women were completely excluded from medical research so we don't know nearly enough about the female body as we should.

Xavier Morrison-Wallace said...

what is interesting to me is the amount of effort an science that goes into the making of sports bras. I do have to agree the size and composition (45) of breast do need to be a factor when designing sports bras, so it is understandable of how much measurements of motion need to be recorded. Also, among all the experimentation required, bras still need to be aesthetically pleasing such as being fashionable and womanly(51).