Wednesday, October 14, 2015

The Rise: Beauty, Error, and Justice

[The Rise]
"An encounter with pictures that moves us, those in the world and the ones it creates in the mind, has a double-barreled power to convey humanity as it is, and, through the power of the imagination, to ignite an inner vision of life as it could be" (90). --Sarah Lewis

"How many movements began when an aesthetic encounter indelibly changed our past perceptions of the world?" (98).  --Sarah Lewis
In the "Beauty, Error, and Justice" chapter of The Rise, Sarah Lewis references this notion of "aesthetic force" (89, 92, 93, 94, 97, 98, 101, 102, 105). What discussion of the idea was particularly useful for how you understood the concept? Why or how so?

18 comments:

Mikaela S said...

On page 93, the author defines the concept of aesthetic force by saying "the words to describe aesthetic force suggest that it leaves up changed - stunned, dazzled, knocked out. It can quicken the pulse, make up gape, even gasp with astonishment" (Lewis 93). This helped me understand this concept by really painting the picture for me in a way. She gave direct examples of this force, and the feelings you may encounter when it happens.

Shervonti N said...

The description on page 105 aided very well in my understanding of aesthetic force. "Aesthetic force is not merely a reflection of a feeling, luxury, or respite from life. The vision we conjure from the experience can serve as an indispensable way out from intractable paths" (Lewis 105). It helped me understand that an aesthetic force is not necessarily something temporary or "blissful" but rather a permanent way for us to deal with things that are tough and not easily controlled. I take this as coping mechanisms being aesthetic forces.

Olivia Slater said...

Prior to reading this chapter, I had a completely different view of the term "aesthetic force". I associated it with vanity. However, Lewis states that "Aesthetic force is not merely a reflection of a feeling, luxury, or respite from life" (93). This gave me a new outlook. Aesthetics is not only pertinent to vain self-worth, but rather a sense of self-acceptance.

Paris Smith said...

On page 93, the author defines the concept of aesthetic force by saying "the words to describe aesthetic force suggest that it leaves up changed - stunned, dazzled, knocked out. It can quicken the pulse, make up gape, even gasp with astonishment" (Lewis 93). I took this as the little moments where you stop and look at the world and just take a moment to enjoy how beautiful life is. It is the moment where you see a beautiful sunset, children playing and laughing, or a mural on a brick wall. I think of these aesthetic forces and the calm in the middle of a storm. When life gets busy, these aesthetic forces are the serene and relaxing times that we have.

Baileigh Scott said...

"Aesthetic force is not merely a reflection of a feeling, luxury, or respite from life" (93). This definition spoke to me. Aesthetic force is not something so simple it can be summed up in a definition, it is a state of total acceptance, something everyone should feel.

Baileigh Scott

Tiera Williams said...

The discussion that helped me most in understanding the term "aesthetic force" is on page 94. The text says, "Our reaction to aesthetic force, more easily than logic, is often how we accept with grace that the ground has shifted beneath our feet" (Lewis 94). This left me with the understanding that aesthetic force is comparable to something potentially great that you have no control over. With no control, acceptance is natural. It's easier than logic because there's not much of a thought process behind it. It is about acceptance of things we cannot change, acceptance is a beautiful thing.

Tiera W.

Jaleelah Muhammad said...

On page 101, Lewis compares aesthetic force to the phenomenon of the unfinished. That it makes us realize that our views and judgments need correction. I think that is really important because we are not always right about everything no matter how much we believe in it and being overcome by this force is a necessary thing in life.

Aliyah B. said...

At the bottom of page 93 Lewis states that, "The words to describe aesthetic force suggest that it leaves us changed--stunned, dazzled, knocked out. It can quicken the pulse, makes us gape, even gasp with astonishment." This led me to understand that aesthetic force doesn't actually have to be about how something looks. Aesthetic force is an overwhelming feeling. I can't exactly describe it, but it is something much deeper than looking at something visually appealing. Aesthetic force consumes you and leaves you awe-struck.

Anitra B. said...

The description on the bottom of page 93 helped me to understand the concept of aesthetic force. Lewis' description led me to believe that aesthetic force has a powerful pull over you when she wrote that "it can quicken the pulse, make us gape, even gasp with astonishment....Its seeming lightness can make us forget that it has weight, force enough to bring about a self-correction". This emphasized how powerful aesthetic force is over someone.

Tashawna N. said...

The idea that was useful for how I understood the concept of aesthetic force came from page 97 when Lewis says that aesthetic force can create a clear line forward, and an alternate route to choose. This was useful to me because it makes you think about the concept more and understand that although there can seem to be a clear path to be followed, there is always another route that can be taken.
~Tashawna Nash

Brianna R. said...

There were two quotes within the chapter which best helped me to understand the concept of aesthetic force. The first quote on page 94 reads,"Our reaction to aesthetic force, more easily than logic, is often how we accept with grace that the ground has shifted beneath our feet" (Lewis). To me this described just how aesthetic force impacts us as an unexpected occurrence which we have to find a way to adapt to. The second quote on page 101 reads "When we're overcome by aesthetic force, a propulsion comes from the sense that, until that moment, we have been somehow incomplete. It can make us realize our views and judgement need correction" (Lewis). This describes aesthetic force as a powerful and emotion provoking experience that can be overwhelming, but in the same light, can help us to reevaluate and change our perspectives for the better.

Ashley B said...

Page 93 also helped me understand what aesthetic force is. Aesthetic force "leaves us changed- stunned, dazzled, knocked out... Not what it is, but what it does to those who behold it in all its forms." I like how Lewis stated that it's not what something is, its what something does.

Alicia Sears said...

I feel page 93 helped me understand the concept of aesthetic force the best. The author paints a vivid picture of this force as something that moves us in a way and makes us face our failures in order to turn over a new leaf.

Kelsey W said...

On pages 94 and 95 was how I understood aesthetic force the best. The author says that there is an emotive power of aesthetic force that get us places and I thought that was very interesting. I also enjoyed and undoubtedly understood the phrase where it explains "aesthetic force can alter vision." It is very interesting how sometimes we think that something is a reality or a fact but really it is our mind playing tricks.

Ta'Mara Woodson said...

The quote "Our reaction to aesthetic force, more easily than logic, is often how we accept with grace that the ground has shifted beneath our feet" on page 94 helped me understand the idea of aesthetic force; Merely because the world, and life, is full of changes and it's all about how you adapt and accept the uncontrollable realities of it. aesthetic force is natural like acceptance.

cassidy oliver said...

Because of my interest in black studies, one of the most awing moments came with the aesthetic of the slave ship and how it could be attributed to the abolition of slavery (Lewis 99).The blue print that was released for public view gave a visual of how inhumane slavery was even from the very beginning. It shows how even though someone may know the truth about something, a visual will help the internalization of that truth.

Quincy Sanderlin said...

The phrase "aesthetic force" seemed a bit ambiguous to me at first. However, it became clearer after reading page 93 when Lewis said "The words to describe aesthetic force suggest that it leaves us changed--stunned, dazzled, knocked out. It can quicken the pulse, makes us gape, even gasp with astonishment." This description gave me the understanding of aesthetic force being an overwhelming, powerful experience.

Maya Estell said...



In this chapter, the opening which went on to detail how Abraham Lincoln delivered the news of the emancipation. Aided in my understanding of the idea and how it was useful in understanding the concept of Aesthetic force. Which by definition aesthetic is a set of principles underlying and guiding the work of a particular artist or artistic movement. I understood this idea as the emancipation was the beginning of a huge year spanning movement for all types of freedom in the United States.