Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Reflections: Being Wrong

Haley Scholars Fall 2013 Reading Groups

We've covered considerable ground so far in Kathryn Schulz's Being Wrong.

Of the issues that we've covered so far concerning Schulz's book, what's one topic or concept that you've found yourself continually thinking about since you read it? Why? 

20 comments:

Maame A. said...

So far, this has been the best book I have read as a Haley Scholar that teaches me things about myself and others that I had not noticed previously.The concept that I find myself continually thinking about is how I view error, being wrong, and mistakes as something negative making me a less person or not as bright. People are told that "everyone makes mistakes" but no one is taught how to live with those mistakes nor likes to be the person that has made the mistake. I have learned the different types of error, how it can affect myself and those around me, and how to truly learn from my mistakes taking them as a blessing instead of a curse!

Ashley Bass said...

I still keep thinking about the illusions. The concept that even when we know what the image is supposed to be and still get it wrong is amazing to me. I have even looked at some illusions just to test this theory and of course it was correct.

Jacqueline C. said...

A topic I found myself thinking about since I read it is: Being wrong. This topic stood out to me because people are wrong everyday, but most don't admit that they are. It is disturbing that people can go through life not admitting their faults like it is alright. We choose whether or not to acknowledge error, and we all need to because we become better people when we do. It helps us grow and learn. Since we are only human, it is normal to be wrong, but it is our decision to choose how we make the situation better.

Brenda W. said...

The topic that still stands out to me chapter after chapter is the concept about how our minds are able to unconsciously convince us we are right even when we are wrong. I have ran into so many instances where I have literally made non-existent connections and evidence in my mind to convince myself I was right or I was making the right decision. It truly is a fear of being wrong and I feel that addressing it and accepting it is the first step in overcoming it. I love the way Schulz analyzed this phenomena; it really got me to evaluate my own mind.

Ajeenah Johnson-Brown said...

One topic that has really stuck with me ever since I read it in Schulz's book, is the fact that we often punish ourselves for our mistakes. Everyone makes mistakes, however, we hold on to our mistakes. We feel shameful, embarrassed, and/or disappointed when we make a mistake.Since reading this, I have tried to let go of my mistakes. Not necessarily that I do not care when I do something wrong, but I realize I can not change the past and try to right my wrongs.

Hilary Conrad said...

The concept that I have taken from this book and think about frequently is that it is ok to be wrong. I still have some problems accepting this concept. It is something that I am working on, but I am enjoying this book so far.

Jenee' B. said...

The concept I have found myself thinking about is how we make different assumptions about people when we disagree with them. I believe the reason I have thought about it quite a bit is that it is one of the few topics in the book that I can really relate to. Also, I tend to find myself disagreeing with other people's opinions a lot, and I have tried to think through these assumptions to assess whether or not I am making one of them at the time. I have been trying to avoid making these assumptions and trying to see things from other people's point of view first.

Monique Williams said...

This text has been very relatable to me and many things I have read in this book has made me much more aware of my actions. If I had to choose one thing that has impacted me the most, I would say the reading about the guilt that comes with making mistakes. I understand that we are all human, and making mistakes is in our blood. I even understand that people need to be forgiven for their mistakes. But when I make a mistake, I question my worth. I am extremely hard on myself and that guilt I carry around is toxic. Instead of focusing negatively on my mistake, I need to learn to look on the bright side. I was taught that out of every bad situation comes some good. Each day, that is something I try to work on. It is incredible how much pressure is lifted off your shoulders when one learns to forgive themselves and actually LEARN something from their mistakes.

Ashya Ford said...

One concept from Schulz's book that resonates with me is the idea that our knowledge is a summation of what we know ourselves and what we have accepted as true from others we trust. I think has such a level of importance to me because it is one concept that should have been obvious, however I just had never thought about it. As I go forward in my career and in my academics, I find that I can see more and more proof of this in everyday scenarios.
-Ashya F.

Kayleigh E. said...

I keep thinking about how we have been brought up to think that our own beliefs are right and everyone else is wrong. We assume everyone is ignorant and just needs to be taught what is right. We never think about how everyone else is thinking that same thing. We as a society need to become more open minded. We need to accept that we are wrong sometimes and stop letting our pride get in the way.

Conradette King said...

The concept that I thought had a profound effect on me was the one about how people's memory can be altered by our need to be right. I thought it was interesting that our mind will distort events or moments so that it benefits us.

Aliyah Butler said...

Honestly, I disagree with Malcom's favoritism towards "practical intelligence" I believe that he is just describing "social intelligence." There are many different types of intelligences. A person can be musically intelligent, tech-savy, or they could even have an upperhand in Science. All of these intelligences are different, but they are still valuable and unique. Just because a person is socially unintelligent does not take away from any talents or skills that they possess.

Jessica H. said...

The concept that stands out to me the most, is the need to be right and not admitting or even acknowledging that we may be wrong. This concept is apparent everybody from just having conversations with people. Some people will argue that they are right and not change their mind.

Najah Hopkins said...

The most profound area of the book for me was Beliefs. The book states that our beliefs are models of the world. In my opinion beliefs are accumulated ideas that hold the same agreeable thought. This agreeable thought process creates models and within those models are rules of acceptable behavior. This book showcases the process of our agreeable thoughts mistaken as factual evidence.

Tia S. said...

The concept I keep thinking about is the fear of mistakes. Schulz talked about how we are so afraid of being wrong that it feels like the end of the world or "so embarrassing I could die". Sometimes we will still try to convince ourselves and others that we are right. Even if the proof is right in our face, we still do this because we're taught that wrongness is bad. However, it doesn't have to be. It's okay to be wrong because through making mistakes we learn and get better. Mistakes can be positive and we should approach them as such instead of beating ourselves down.

Jennifer Johnson said...

this book has made me make conscious changes in the way I think and debate about things. The fact that things are usually exaggerated is what made me see the need for reevaluation of my thought processes

Kiara Gay said...

One idea that I have found my self continually thinking about is the ignorance assumption. It is interesting that people really do perceive as being ignorant because we see ourselves as being right. When we think that we know every aspect of a situation, then and that the facts support our own beliefs. People have always been guilty of this concept because everyone always believes that what they say it true, especially when they are passionate about that subject.

Sandra Nnoung said...

I keep finding myself thinking about being wrong. I realized that I do not like admitting that I am wrong and that is, in a way, related ti how society is. People are often ridiculed when they are proven wrong and that I something I find myself fearing at times. I will sometimes argue a point ardently even when I suspect I may be wrong. I remember growing up with the belief that what I think is right and anything else may be wrong. Reading confirmed my more receny thoughts that this is not a good way to think.

Stelisa J. said...

One of the main ideas that Schulz explained that I continually think about is that it is okay to be wrong. The concept of being wrong should not be perceived as the end of the world. Mistakes can positively shape the future of a person’s life and should be embraced. As people may commonly hear, “You can learn from your mistakes”; I believe this to be true, experiences whether positive or negative molds your future and can surely aid in substantial growth and success in life.

Maya Estell said...

The recurring issue in the book is the differentiation of right and wrong in the book. This is an issue that is present in everyone’s life. The books talks about the struggle with in yourself subconsciously to convince yourself that what you are dong may be wrong but it’s okay to do it. This issue is very relatable to our everyday lives and the decision making process.

Maya Estell