Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Outliers: Reflections

Haley Scholars Fall 2013 Reading Groups

We've covered several concepts and ideas so far in Malcolm Gladwell's  Outliers.

Of the issues that we've covered concerning Gladwell's book, what's one topic or concept that you've found yourself continually think about since you read it? Why? 

26 comments:

Sierra Ewing said...

The two parts of "The Trouble with Geniuses" section brought up some intriguing and challenging thoughts for me. I appreciated the fourth section of part one where it discusses the contrasts between the IQs and imaginations and how they also go hand in hand as critical traits. The other captivating section to me was in part two of "The Trouble with Geniuses" when it discusses practical intelligence. As much as I appreciate book smarts, it is also important to learn skills in and out of the classroom for certain situations. This skill is set apart from analytical abilities. Just interesting thoughts.

Isaiah Blackburn said...

The chapter that talked about the cut off dates had the biggest impact on me because I have a September birthday. I knew I was one of the oldest in my class but I never would have known that I had an unfair advantage because of my age. I always thought that I was being limited by being held back another year. Thinking this, I would always try to be the best at everything because I thought that I felt like I was a year behind.

Quincy S said...

Of the concepts that we've covered so far, the one that has had the most effect on me is the role of community in the development of outliers. I think about this idea the most because I have always taken credit for my success thus far. However, this idea reminds me that I have also gotten this far and will continue to grow, considerably due to the support,power, and love from my family and community.

Andrea R. said...

The 10,000 Hour Rule, because it made me think about the work that I put in for the things I'm interested in. It also made me think about the opportunities I have and how I should consider taking them if I want to reach my goals.

Aside from those things though, I also found it to be quite interesting even though I didn't fully agree with the idea.

Joey Norwood said...

The chapter that talked about how you have to practice 10,000 hours in order to be a master at something. Hearing this change the entire way that I go about training, practicing, or studying. Now instead of hating the fact that I have to study or practice, I now embrace it and keep saying to myself you have to make every hour count, so you can get to 10,000.

Alex J. said...

So far in Outliers by Malcom Gladwell, the most interesting concept in mind dealt with the cut off dates. Before reading, I knew there were certain cut offs but I never considered the various roles these cut offs play, especially in certain countries. Sometimes I wonder how much different things would be if there weren't cut off dates or if they were changed slightly. Also, I wonder how the individuals that were "cut-off" feel about the whole concept entirely.

Anitra Bell said...

Out of the several topics we have covered this far, the Roseto mystery has stuck with me the most. I found it interesting that the Rosetans remained healthier than the Americans even after they had adopted the American lifestyle. Before reading this I thought that if you had the same eating habits as someone that caused them health problems then you would inherit those same problems as well. But this wasn't true for the Rosetans. The fact they they able to create their own world separate from others also intrigued me. Instead of coming to America and letting the pressures of the modern world get to them, the Rosetans took care of each other and created a powerful, protective, and stable community.

Lindsey McCall said...

The concept that has stuck with me the most is the story in the introduction of the book and how it tied into cut off dates. I found it very easy to relate to due to my birthday being in August. It was extremely interesting to me how we think we're helping by setting these cut off dates, but we're actually putting many minds at a disadvantage.

Belainesh Nigeda said...

I think that Gladwell has appropriately named the book. As I read the book, I think of all of the key components that I may need to ensure my success. I think that is what Gladwell felt that he did with this book. He put together stories of outliers and analyzed how and why they became successful. Gladwell gives me the impression that there are ingredients, certain things required to make sure I am likely to succeed.

Deandre Howard said...

A common concept that boggles me is the Matthew Effect. It is incredulous to see this as a sound argument. The idea alone baffles me.

To paraphrase, it presents that certain humans develop more due to the time period in the year where they are born (usually it is the early months, e.g April). I understand events that happen only once for certain age groups where people are locked out just because of a month difference (even then most of these 'events' are not developmental). The problem I have is when he dare 'suggests' that biological developments favor those who are born in an early part of the year.

One does not simply make assumptions. He ignored biological inequity in long term developments. Even then short term developmental inequity (especially intellectual developmental inequity) virtually does not exist for those with no inherent handicap of biological development.

Shervonti Norman said...

The concept that has left me continuously thinking has to be the one concerning social class (environment) having a huge effect on how a person will make it in the world. I have been comparing my own situation to close friends and even others in my family and have noticed a lot of differences. I have never really had to be pushed by anyone in my family because I have always wanted to strive to be my best. I beat myself up more than anyone ever could. I'm pretty sure that mindset came from my mother who would always tell me that nothing was going to be handed to me, I had to work for it. She never discouraged anything that I did. Comparing to one of my close friends, her family would be considered in a higher social class than mine. She definitely reached the point of feeling entitled but now it's just left her where her parents are MAKING her pursue a certain career. I couldn't imagine being placed in that situation.

Anonymous said...

One concept that I'm continually thinking about is the 10,000 hour rule. I'm continually focused on this rule because I want to become a successful mechanical engineer. I'm always pondering "is this how many hours I have to put in for my degree to reach actual success"? Part of me hopes not because it sounds like a lot of work, but if I truly want something, I guess I have to put in the time. -Stephen K

Antione Lane said...

The chapter about the geniuses keeps popping into my head. In the real world a person has to be book smart and able to relate to others. After a certain point of intelligence there is really no reason to continue. Lessons learned outside of the classroom can be just as important as the lessons learned inside ofthe classroom.

gabriel said...

As of recent, I have had the phrase cumulative advantage, on my mind. Cumulative advantage is the idea that those that have more will continue having more. In the other hand, those that have less will more then likely continue to have less. In the book, those that had advantages over the others (time, money, or age) ended up being more of a success. Those that have more connections tend to communicate and find opportunities easier. In turn allowing them to make even more connections. If you have time and the resources you will definitely be better off than the next guy. With money, time, or age you have the advantages that excel you to even greater growth.

Andriana C. said...

Of all the topics discussed in Outliers, cumulative advantage has stuck with me the most. Though this section is mostly common knowledge, it has made me think of all the opportunities given to some and denied to others in a different light. Based on where, to whom and with what you are born, your life is already at a serious advantage, though for only so long. i can most relate to this section of the book, so it remains a memorable part of the book for me.

Anonymous said...

Mercedes H
The one topic that leaves me thinking is the role of the community on one's life. It is very interesting to take this possibility and apply it to your life and see how it works. All the people that play a role in your life and all the activities that mold you as a person are very much real. As I live my everyday life, I never paid much attention to how others have affected my life in such a powerful way. Before reading Outliers, I never paid much attention because I assumed I made all my decisions and actions based on me when in reality everything and everyone in my life has made an impact on those decisions and activities.

Evan Townzen said...

Looking back, two chapters really stand alone in my memory. They really motivated me to push even harder to realize goals. Although it has been just a short time I really feel like "The Trouble with Geniuses" chapters brought up something I can keep with me. Tha1t was that being a genius does not matter as long as you are smart enough. To me this says that you are who you make yourself and that hardwork will pay off.

Alexandra Donaldson said...

The concept that has stuck with me was in The Matthew Effect chapter when it discussed cutoff dates. It has had such an impact because my birthday is in August which is in the later half of the year. It amazes me that we believe cutoff dates are being beneficial, when in hindsight they are doing more bad than good.
Alex D.

Aliyah Butler said...

Definitely the "10,000 Hour Rule" chapter. I just started teaching myself how to play piano and this is a skill that I would love to master. I've been thinking about how I can incorporate enough hours into my week so that I can learn how to master the piano by the time I turn 28. This chapter is encouraging me, because it gives me a set amount of hours that I would have to achieve instead of trying to just practice whenever I feel like it.

sierra lucas said...

The topic about the 10,000 hours really made me think about my work ethic in high school and how that wasn't true for me back then but now it is a completely different story. Now that I am in college I dedicate almost all my time to my school work and it is very frustrating because this is something that I am not use to. It really just makes me wish that I had picked up these habits in high school so that it wouldn't be such a struggle to keep my grades up.
Sierra L.

Ashley A. said...

The Mathew Effect has definitely captivated my mind. It upsets me to think that real measures haven't been taken to fix the Mathew Effect within schools, and I feel like I need to do something about it. In my spare time I do a bit of research, so I can find solutions and hopefully write persuasively about it someday.

Trion Taylor said...

The most interesting concept to me is accumulative advantage and how it plays into both education and sports, but mainly education. How such a small initial advantage could continuously get bigger until it puts them way ahead of others who were unfortunate enough to be born to late. I would never have dreamed that something like this could be possible. But knowing about it now I think that I see its workings earlier in life.

Jeremiah Blackburn said...

The topic that I have pondered the most about is the 10,000 hour rule. I have experimented with this concept and realized that you have to truly love what do in order to spend so much time mastering it. With a little bit of luck and a passion for what you do I think that anyone can reach the 10,000 hour mark.

Marissa Williams said...

One concept that really caught my attention is in chapter four when Christopher's mother did not help him with his paperwork for his scholarship; in which he did not receive.

This especially caught my attention because I completely understand wheat he felt like when this happened. My mother gave me a hard time when it came to filling out forms and what not for college.

This raises the question of, if parents know that their children want to go to college and the process of doing so is not easy, then why do they make it hard for the child?

Jermeia Avery said...

The concept that I have thought about the most is the genius concept. I believe that learning is non stop. We learn from the moment we are born to the moment we die. that being said social awareness and how well you socialize is something the individual controls. Social standing is very important especially when a person is trying to move up I life. Therefore social sanding is just as important as knowledge. It is not always what you know, but you know.

Celeste C. said...

The 10,000 hour rule is still something that runs through my mind on a daily basis. I was taught that practice makes perfect and in reality that is true. People wonder what separates those who reach success and those who don't and that is time and effort that is put into reaching their goal.
Also, if only more communities were united like the Rosetan community I believe the world could be dramatically impacted in a positive way. Something so small as communicating and caring for people can clearly have health benefits. If only people knew that being social and having strong bonds with others could help their life style.