Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Wrongology

Haley Scholars Fall 2013 Reading Groups 

"Wrongness is a vital part of how we learn and change. Thanks to error, we can revise our understanding of ourselves and amend our ideas about the world" (5). --Kathryn Schulz

In the first chapter of Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error, Schulz begins making a case for why we might benefit by thinking more seriously about ho integral wrongness is to who we are. She unpacks multiple facets of error and charts out the way forward for her book.

Of the many concepts she references in the first chapter,which one drew your interest most and why?

12 comments:

Jacqueline C. said...

The concept of acknowledging our own errors stood out to me the most. This is because most people love the feeling of being right about any and everything, and will just boast for a while about it. If someone is wrong, they won't dwell on it. We need to think about being wrong and actually admit it and not feel bad about it, but learn from it.Doing so, we become better individuals and can teach others to recognize error as well.

Ashya Ford said...

I found it interesting that she said it is important to be wrong, and after reading further into her beliefs, I agree. I think this concept is important and it stands out because it truly allows enables you to learn how to do things more effectively. It also allows you to truly understand and accept responsibility for your errors rather than blaming them on someone/something else and/or downplaying the mistake.
-Ashya F.

Jenee' B. said...

The concept that was most interesting to me was that being wrong cannot be a present state and that by the time that you actually realize that you're wrong, you're right. This was interesting because I have never taken the time to think about that. Also, I think this may be part of the reason most people feel bad for a while after they find out they were wrong. They feel like they are still in a state of wrongness, instead of being happy or relieved that they now know the truth.

Kiara Gay said...

The concept that stood out the most to me in the reading was the idea that being wrong is far from being a mark of indifference or intolerance, wrongness is a vital part of how we learn and change. This stood out to me because without error there would be no room for change our critical thinking. Everything would just be as is, and no one would ever be capable of imagination, and their own creative way of thinking.

Stelisa J. said...

Overall, the first few chapters were pretty interesting. Specifically, I was intrigued at the thought of error being positive or good. The concept of error usually carries a negative connotation and any negative feelings as well. After receiving this insight, I do believe that it may be more efficient to think of error positively. It is commonly stated that, " a person can learn from there mistakes".I agree and think that after a certain situation or "error" you can take the situation and learn from it to become aware and gain wisdom. Errors should begin to take a new literal meaning.

Kizzy Hopkins said...

The history of science as it is compared to all facets of life; politics, medicine, child-rearing, technology, law, and religion was most interesting. Schulz acknowledges the variations of life and its many blueprints of truths and falsehoods. Simply by social agreeableness we accept said realities as our truth later to have them proved wrong. Schulz sheds light on the mere human existence which is human evolution. Our ability to grow, and make mistakes is also how we grow and expand our knowledge.

Maame A said...

I really enjoyed reading the first chapter in this book and I would say out of all the books I have read for this program, this one so far seems the most interesting. What stood out the most in this reading was the idea that when we are wrong we are actually right and seeing it in a positive manner. Personally I think this is a great way of looking at life especially for people that are stubborn such as myself. I HATE being wrong and I try to take measures to make sure that I am not. When I am I usually get an attitude or try to find a way to make it so I was partially right. After reading this section, it has made me look at how what I have been doing is more negative than admitting to my wrong and owning it. I know look at my wrongs as something that should be deeper examined: what caused me to be wrong and how can I be right on the subject matter in the future, instead on focusing on not being right.

Aliya Foster said...

The idea that stood out most to me in the reading was when she made the statement that we can not be wrong and know it at the same time. This realy spoke to me because I had never looked at "being" wrong as a fallacy itself. I think that this idea should be told to more people because it will change their way of thinking about wrongness.

Ashley bass said...

The concept that interested me the most was when Kathryn Schultz discussed how being wrong was positive. Many of us get sad or mad when we do something wrong. We never really think of what we did wrong as being positive. When realistically what we did wrong is positive. It helps us learn what to do and what not to do in the future. Being wrong and being told that something is wrong definitely has its benefits.

Hilary Conrad said...

I personally struggle with wanting to be right a majority of the time and it is sometimes hard to admit when I am wrong. This reading opened my mind as to the positives of being wrong which i have never thought of before. There is a lot to be learned from being wrong and an interesting concept discussed is that by the time you realize you are wrong, you are actually right.

Jasmine said...

The concept that sparked my interest the most was the one that error is a positive thing. I was most interested in this concept because I've always agreed with it. I have always believe that we as people make mistakes.

We always want to be right about everything and in a way fear being wrong, but in reality we need to have our wrong moments. They teach us more than being right does and they also humble us in a way that only error can.

Jessica H. said...

The concept that stood out to me was that we do not acknowledge our own errors. In general, people love the thought of being right, instead of admitting that they are wrong. Overall, this causes an issue. We have to start admitting our faults and not look at it as a failure.