Wednesday, September 25, 2013

On Being Wrong, Chapter 5: Our Minds, Part Two: Belief

Haley Scholars Fall 2013 Reading Groups 

According to Kathryn Schulz, her book Being Wrong is "about what happens when our beliefs, including our most fundamental, convincing, and important ones fail us" (91). She then goes into defining what belief is, and it turns out that Schulz's coverage of belief and how it works assists in illuminating why beliefs have consequences and carry weight.

Later, Schulz notes that "every one of us confuses our models of the world with the world itself--not occasionally or accidentally but necessarily" (107). That confusion and our assumptions about those who believe differently than we do explains why conflicts arise and become increasingly problematic.

Of the three assumptions that she mentioned (Ignorance, Idiocy, and Evil), which one was most compelling to you and why?

11 comments:

Jacqueline C. said...

The Evil Assumption was the most compelling to me. This is because people are so quick to turn their backs against something that doesn't make sense or relate to their own beliefs.Just because someone has a different view on something doesn't automatically mean that they are evil. The humankind can be very cruel and we need to really change that.

Jasmine said...

I found the ignorance assumption to be the most compelling. This is due to the fact that so many people either fear what they don't know or think they know what they don't. Ignorance can be bliss but I feel in the time we live it is just plain dangerous and detrimental.

Maame Antwi said...

When reading chapter five I thought the ignorance assumption was the most interesting because it is very true. As stated in the chapter, the ignorance assumption believes that people who disagree just haven't been exposed to the right information and being exposed would make them right, like how you are. I think this is how most people, especially in a scholarly community such as an institution, follow this assumption. However, this assumption isn't always right because people are sometimes wrong. At the end of the disruption of this assumption, the author mentioned that "When other people reject our beliefs, we think they lack good information. When we reject their beliefs, we think we possess good judgment." I think its important for people to be aware of this way of thinking because I believe we all do it, and the only way to change is to be aware of it.

Kayleigh E. said...

I found the ignorance assumption to be most compelling. People (myself included) sometimes get this idea that we are right and everyone that disagrees with us just doesn't know our side. We think if we enlightened them they would see the real truth and agree with us. Everyone is raised with certain beliefs and who is to say that one if right and one is wrong? This assumption really made me think.

Hilary Conrad said...

I found the Evil Assumption interesting to read because it bothers me when people are so judge mental towards others without seeing things from their point of view. People need to realize that is is OK to have differing views than other people and to respect their beliefs.

Ashya Ford said...

I think that the Idiocy Assumption was the most interesting. I know that personally, I have often thought that some people actually do know what they are talking about, but in order to avoid being "wrong", but they will just say they were unaware or ignorant to the facts.
Ashya F.

Ashley Bass said...

After reading the chapter, I found the ignorance assumption to be the most compelling. The ignorance assumption happens all the time. People always want someone to agree with them and will go out of their way to make someone have the same ideas as them, because they think they are right and the other person and their beliefs are wrong. People are blind or ignorant to their own ideas and don't realize that their own ideas aren't for everybody.

Najah Hopkins said...

The most compelling assumption was ignorance. They assumption that are beliefs are factual. Ignorant Assumption happens when personal opinions clash. It is automatically assumed that are beliefs are factual. The problem arises when we criticise others that are not in agreence with our beliefs. Beliefs are subjective thoughts that are made factual through multiple people agreeing on the same thing ( O'Brien, 2013).

Jenee' B. said...

The most compelling to me was the Ignorance Assumption because I have observed that many people tend to do this, including myself. It helped me to think about whenever I have a disagreement with someone. I tend assume that I am always right and need to explain and get the person to see things the way I do; the "right" way. I realized that maybe I shouldn't just take on this position and instead I should sometimes try to see things their way before I try to convince them of how wrong they are.

Kiara Gay said...

The ignorance assumption was the most compelling to me because it seems to be the one that I can relate to real life experience. Usually when I debate with someone about a topic and I have a separate belief than they, i do believe they they are just ignorant of the facts and that they will change their perspective if I educate them on the matter. People attempt to change others beliefs all of the time especially when they think that they are right and believe their argument to be the only real one there is.

Jessica H said...

The ignorance assumption so the most compelling to me. I found this compelling because the ignorance assumption can be wrong and we are wrong. In general, people can be wrong or have a different opinion than the next person. But being ignorant can prevent you from learning new idea or thought.