Wednesday, September 18, 2013

On Being Wrong, Chapter 4: Our Minds, Part One

 Haley Scholars Fall 2013 Reading Groups 

"Wrongness knows no limits...there is no form of knowledge, however central or unassailable  it may seem, that cannot, under certain circumstances, fail us" (69). --Kathryn Schulz 

In chapter 4 "Our Minds," in her book Being Wrong, Kathryn Schulz discusses how seemingly accurate memories of events end up being inaccurate. Over time, our memories can become "riddled with errors" yet continue "to feel so right" (73).  She later points out that "we are bad knowing we don't know," and most of us "are noticeably better at generating theories than registering our own ignorance" (82-83). 

After reading Schulz's chapter, what's one specific way you now view the accuracy or inaccuracy of your memory? Or, how did the chapter influence your view concerning the limits of your knowledge?

10 comments:

Conradette King said...

The chapter really made me realize that my memory was not as accurate as i thought it was. i guess the chapter made me realize that their is a limit to my knowledge and that i don't have as good as a memory as i thought I did, especially when it comes to important dates.

Ajeenah Johnson-Brown said...

In Chapter 4, Schulz's discusses memory. She brings up the fact that sometimes we belive we remember something very well, however, we are often innacurate about some details. I know this has happened to me before. Especially if it a memory we would rather forget, we sometimes add dramtic details or take key details from the situation. Overtime, this becomes our reality. Schulz also talks about there being a limit to our knowledge/memory. It is impossible for us to remember everything.

Brenda W. said...

This chapter made me re-evaluate the way I recall things in my mind. There are so many instances in my life where I recalled a story the way I wanted it to happen as opposed to how it really did happen. This chapter opened my eyes to a way in which my mind functions. I am definitely an example of someone who generates theories instead of registering my own ignorance. It may be out of fear of being wrong, or it could just simply be that I do not know the limits of my knowledge. Either way it goes, this chapter got me to think on a deeper level about how my mind registers "being wrong".

Sandra Nnoung said...

When recounting a story from the past I usually remember it being more intense or dramatic than it actually was. Reading this chapter made me realize that I sometimes remember things the way I wish they had happened. I substitute certain facts that may be irrelevant to the situation. This showed me that my memory is not as good as I originally thought. I realized that it's better to know my limitations than to live thinking I am more knowledgeable than I really am.

monique williams said...

A few semesters ago, I took a cognitive psychology class and I was taught that memory is much more delicate then we give credit. We often think that our memory is a absolute thing, but research has shown that our memory is not as accurate as we would like to think. We are all guilty of adding a little fabrication to our memories, but it is not always a conscious thing. I think often our memories get confused with what we wanted and expected to happen. Being aware that our memories can be fragile is a crucial thing.

Tia S. said...

I realize that I can't always trust my memory. There are times when I'm so sure that something happened one way, but someone else says it happened another. The chapter reminded me of a show I watched on memory. It showed how other people could influence the way we remember our own memories (not always in an accurate way). I know my memory is limited and can get messed up, but as Schulz says in an earlier chapter, it's okay to make mistakes.

Jessica Oranika said...

This chapter made me realize that although I may think that I remember some thing clearly that probably isn't the case. It wasnt such a surprise to me because I have had memories of events that happened when I was younger that we're recorded. Later on when I saw the videos they weren't exactly as I had remembered. My emotions that day had a lot to do with how I remembered the event.

Jennifer Johnson said...

this chapter made me draw more accurate conclusions on my memory. I originally believed that how i recall things is ALWAYS correct, but now I realize that a lot of times I recall things the way I would like them to be just because I may want to be right about something.

Ke'Asha jones said...

After reading this chapter it just made me think that often times we are speaking of a memory and someone who was in that memory does not remember the way you do could it be that your memory is being inaccurate and construing the memory and the other person memory for this particular memory was accurate. I often find my self in predicaments were i remember something and then as i am telling someone else the memory i am like wait did it really happen like this or am i mixing to different memories into one. This reading just made me think is anyone's memory really 100% accurate or are our memories merely 95% accurate.

Stelisa J. said...

Over time, I begin to realize that what once I knew as a reality has now become a fantasy. I once thought that my memory was pretty accurate in comparison to others. Although, recently I have noticed that I sometimes have misconception as to what really happened in the past. I would began to merge actual memories with ideas of what I "think" should have happened. I would unintentionally tell a memory thinking it happened in that order, but then I would soon realize that is not the case. After reading the chapter, I have to come to the conclusion that memories may have actually taken place, but other factors can distort this reality