Wednesday, April 13, 2016

The Warmth of Other Suns: (527 – 538)

[The Warmth of Other Suns]


By Ashley S. Cartman 
“All told, perhaps the most significant measure of the Great Migration was the act of leaving itself, regardless of the individual outcome. Despite the private disappointments and triumphs of any individual migrant, the Migration, in some ways, was its own point. The achievement was in making the decision to be free and acting on that decision, wherever that journey led them” (535). -- Isabel Wilkerson 

Sometimes, success is not measured by the outcome of the situation, but by the fight given during the journey. Sometimes the scariest part of deciding whether to act on something or not, is the haunting thought of “what if” one does not do it.

Based on this week’s reading of the Epilogue from The Warmth of Other Suns, what did you view as one of the notable overall results of the Great Migration beyond the “private disappointments and triumphs”?

35 comments:

Mikaela S said...

On page 538, Wilkerson explains some of the positive aspect of the great migration. In my opinion the most notable overall result of the Great Migration is when she says, "The Great Migration was the final break from an abusive union with the South. It was a step in freeing not just the people who fled, but the country whose mountains they crossed" (Wilkerson pg. 538). While there were many disappointments and triumphs, that quote alone makes all the difference simply because they overcame a lot of things.

Olivia S. said...

Wilkerson does take a special interest in the individual journey of migrants; the personal struggles and triumphs plays a large part in this portion of the book. However, another significant factor to the Great Migration was the effect as whole on society. Diversification, acceptance, and a strong sense of accomplishment was brought along with one's own person victory. Sometimes, the greatest impact is on society as whole, how it reflects on the newly forming society, and the overall changes for future generations as a whole. "The Great Migration was the final break from an abusive union with the South" (538) shows the formation of a new societal mentality. Tolerance, acceptance, and sense of entitlement for basic human civility was becoming more prominent. This is most certainly reflected in modern day society.

Shervonti N. said...

​The most notable result for me had to do with the fact that "[the migrants] did not ask to be accepted but declared themselves the Americans that perhaps few others recognized but that they had always been deep within their hearts" (538). To me, this appeared as an underlying bonus to the great things these individuals already accomplished. This could only happen because the migrants decided that they wanted their freedom (which in turn lead to getting the title they deserved). As discussed in the epilogue, many migrants did not want to claim that they were migrants due to that fact that the South was still America. Even in the south, these individuals were American... they just were not treated as such. Through the migration, they became what they rightly deserved to be viewed as. Despite the fact that others still may not agree, in their hearts they knew it was true.

Erica King said...

On age 538, it states, "It was a transition from an era when one race owned another; to an era when the dominant class gave up ownership but kept control over the people it once had owned" this statement was the most notable for me because even though it wasn't much of a change and in a way there was still ownership going on, the blacks look at it as a huge step in the right direction. It just showed how grateful they were about everything, big or little, back in the day when now most things our generation takes fro granted.

Jaleelah Muhammad said...

On page 532, it states, " George Starling succeeded merely by not being lynched. Just living was an achievement". The sad and unfortunate truth is that this concept is still applicable to many Black Americans. It's been nearly 50 years since the end of the Migration and we can still feel its aftermath. Starling didn't receive the education that he desired but he may have earned an education that was worth so much more.

Kaine C. said...

On page 538, it says, "The Great Migration was the final break from an abusive union with the South. It was a step in freeing not just the people who fled, but the country whose mountains they crossed." This was most notable to me because this is the hindsight view. Nobody knew this would happen, but this is what they wanted to do. This helped out their situation around the whole U.S.

Paris Smith said...

One of the most notable quotes was on page 538 where it said "The Great Migration was the final break from an abusive union with the South. It was a step in freeing not just the people who fled, but the country whose mountains they crossed". I just felt like no matter what happened after they left the South, that leaving the South would have been their biggest success. They were free from all the torture and abuse and even if they didn't make the life that they wanted to in the North, they could at least say that they got away, they could say that they at least gave themselves the opportunity to have a better life for themselves and future generations.

Carlie Bibbs said...

A notable overall result that was left after the Great Migration was mentioned on page 538 as everyone else mentioned. I think this part is also notable because it describes how black migrants had to find a place in this country despite that it wasn't given to them. They were forced to stand up for themselves despite being rejected and looked upon negatively. And throughout the good and the bad, they remained strong.

Asher said...

The great migrations, was surely a great migration for this novel. We went from being introduced to these fleshed out characters, to seeing where they are now. On page 537-538, the quote "The Great Migration was the final break form an abusive union with the South. It was a step in freeing not just the people who fled, but the country whose mountains they crossed." That is so important, to recognize that they didn't choose to leave, they were practically forced out, by the horrible treatment of the blacks. That the south was so horrible, that they felt no other way was comprehensible. And through all the moving, and the danger, and the fear of a new place, they still continued to push and persevere, and also remain strong.

-Asher Denkyirah

Brianna R. said...

I think that one notable result overall was just that people committed to making an effort to better their lives, the lives of their children and future generations to come. The act of doing so had an immense amount of power in itself. They made the journey despite knowing that what they hoped for and dreamed of might not come to fruition. As quoted on page 535 "All told, perhaps the most significant measure of the great migration was the act of leaving itself, regardless of any individual outcome...The achievement was in making the decision to be free and acting on that decision, wherever the journey led them". Just having the courage and strength to take such a leap of faith despite the risks was the greatest feat in my opinion.

Kiara C said...

The paragraph at the bottom of page 537 going on to the top of page 538 was very notable to me. The fact that the blacks migrating were considered to be immigrants even though it was their blood and the blood of their ancestors who built this country is insane. But getting the recognition of being a full citizen is something so powerful and long overdue.

Alicia S said...

The most notable overall result of the great migration is how the blacks from the south were able to make a way for themselves despite how hard the journey was and show that they would not back down. Most of them left with so little and were still able to take care of their business and make a way for their kids. Their courage has continued to leave great marks on future generations and for that I feel as if this was the most powerful result.

Natasha said...

I agred with everyone that page 538 was a very empowering point in the book. It shows that these strong people did break free of the torture and hatred from the South. The people were free and also "the country whose mountains they crossed." It was a huge step in bringing together the United States as one. There would still be the "North" and the "South," but the divinding line wouldn't be as strict as it was before. Overall, no matter where these people went, they freed themselves. That's the most important.

Tayler G said...

As the quote says, "Despite the private disappointments and triumphs of any individual migrant, the Migration, in some ways, was its own point. The achievement was in making the decision to be free and acting on that decision, wherever that journey led them” (535). -- Isabel Wilkerson, the most notable result from the Great Migration was actually getting out of captivity and moving on to freedom. Despite the "private disappointments" if people back then wouldn't have made the choices they did, most African Americans today would not be where they are now.
Tayler G.

Joshua Jones said...

Page 538 was a game changer. It clearly showed how people broke free from being tortured and discriminated against in the south. The self empowerment is the most important idea here. The migration allowed a more diverse spread, or diaspora, of black people across the north and south.

Persephone C. said...

At the top of page 531, Wilkerson talks about how "The migration changed American culture as we know it." African Americans brought light to new music--jazz, rock, rhythm and blues, and hip-hop. Along with music, the migrants influenced many more changes, such as language and food. The most notable overall result of the great migration was the change in culture that it brought.

Anitra B. said...

As others have mentioned, pg. 538 demonstrated the notable results of the Great Migration. I found this last page to be powerful as Wilkerson described the the transition of the era and how African Americans broke free from the hold of the South. The quote from Lawrence R. Rodgers on pg. 538 was most powerful. He stated that "In the simple process of walking away one by one millions of African-American southerners have altered the course of their own, and all of America's, history". Those that had the courage and strength to do something as simple, yet frightening, as taking a stand and walking away paved the future for all African Americans now.

John Kriha said...

One of the most notable overall results of the great migration, as stated on page 535, was how “ Despite the private disappointments and triumphs of any individual migrant, the migration, in some ways, was its own point”. The migrant blacks had a sense of great determination. Making the decision to migrate to the North in hopes of finding a better life for themselves, their families, and their community, should been seen as a major achievement. It was this migration that led to the much needed cultural diversification in the North that we are still experiencing the effects of 50 years later.

Lawrence Payne said...

The thing most notable to me was the fact that they persevered. The point of the migration was to reach a place where hard work and treatment was better than what they currently had. Through all the deaths and diseases that hit, they kept on living but never forgetting who they are as a people and where they started. Like it was stated on page 535, "... the migration, in some ways was its own turning point". By working hard to keep their new lives, yet keeping their culture, the people in the north developed not only as individuals but also a community.

Alona Davenport said...

On page 538 in the very last paragraph, it is stated "By their actions, they did not dream the American Dream, they willed it into being by a definition of their own choosing. This outcome was notable to me because it shows how they made what we know as the American Dream into something that would benefit them. Back then, the American Dream wasn't really something that black people could experience. With the Great Migration, they were, then, able to do what was good for them.

Kelsey W said...

I think one of the greatest results achieved aside from freedom was the education. Many migrants left not only to make a better life for themselves but for their children and their children's children and so on. It says on page 536 that many of the southern migrants would do just as well as northern born blacks and have a better education than those who stayed in the south. Along with the education received, some would go on to use that education to be doctors, businessman, etc. We had so many accomplishments in music back in that time period come out and it is amazing to know that with the help of these migrants who were brave enough to make the biggest change of their lives, we today can feel the profound effects that they caused.

Ashley Bass said...

A notable result from the Great Migration can be seen on pg.538. This page describes how blacks not only made a change for themselves, but they changed America forever. Because of the courage of so many people, history was able to be changed.

Keanu Rodriguez said...

One of the most notable overall results of the Great Migration was on page 538, where it said "The Great Migration was the final break from an abusive union with the South. It was a step in freeing not just the people who fled, but the country whose mountains they crossed." I feel that this quote was definitely a good description in showing not just the individual impact of those who migrated, but the overall result of the Great Migration, and the fact that it paved the way for black people in America during those times, and also years down the road.
Keanu Rodriguez

Bryce Barker said...

The overall result is that no one should ever feel like they are not good enough to do something and The Great Migration did that. Triumphs and disappointments aside, it shows that if you can will yourself to move forward to better and happier life nothing will be able to stop you. What ifs are only if you make the decision that your heart isn't all in. The Great Migration is perseverance and shows that nothing is capable of being stopped unless you give up.

Shardai J-H. said...

One of the notable overall results of the Great Migration was, as mentioned on page 535, "Their children would have a chance to grow up free of Jim Crow and to be their fuller selves." Many of our families, including mine paved the way for us to live the live that is offered to us today. If it had not been for our great-grand or grandparents establishing a family where they did, we would not be afforded the same opportunities for education and expansion of our quality of life.

cassidy oliver said...

The epilogue stated that the great migration was the stake in the relationship "with the abusive south" (Wilkerson 538). The idea of the south being abusive, but not the rest of the country. The conditions of the south was the abuse that blacks were suffering from. But in reality the entire country abused blacks. But the migration forever changed the demographics of the united states.

jingolder said...

A notable overall result was, as stated on page 528, was that there most blacks that made the trip from the south to the north were more likely to remain married, raise children in a two-parent household, and be employed than the blacks that were already in the north. This was interesting to me, as I wonder if this was due to those from the south placing more value in these privileges than those that grew up in the north with a slightly higher quality of life.

-John H.

Jade H. said...

One of the most notable overall results is when Wilkerson says on page 538, "The Great Migration was the final break from an abusive union with the South. It was a step in freeing not just the people who fled, but the country whose mountains they crossed." This touched me in so many ways, to must feel how they felt just blows me. This quote is so strong and shows that when people unite, they can overcome many obstacles that are thrown their way.

-Jade H.

Xavier Morrison- Wallace said...

I think the overall good that came from the great migration is the beginning of America becoming integrated and diverse. The descendants of the great migration were probably taught to be more tough and were able to work harder than others to achieve recognition. It put African Americans in a position where they weren't as oppressed and had more opportunity to become want they want. Just like immigrants from other countries came to the U.S.(531), this "New World" was the true free America and those who migrated were in pursuit of the American dream which was the something Arthur Fauset was possibly talking about in his quote on page 592.

Tiera Williams said...

On page 538 it is stated, "With the benefit of the hindsight , the century between Reconstruction and the end of the great migration perhaps may be seen as a necessary stage of upheaval. It was a transition from an era when one race owned another; to an era when the dominant class gave up ownership but kept control over the people it once had owned, at all costs, using violence even; to the eventual acceptance of the servant caste into the mainstream." I feel like this quote pinpoints not only a major turning point, but also points out how it didn't totally change everything, but how it did shine light on problems America faced.

Tiera W.

Tashawna Nash said...

In this epilogue, I think that an overall result that is most notable came from the last page, 538, because it talks about how black migrants had to find a place for themselves in this country. There was so much negativity thrown towards people of color yet they managed to stay strong through it all and though they did not come out on top, they did not finish last either.

Jonathan Pittman said...

I think the biggest change that America got out of the great migration would be how we directly impacted the economy. While King Cotton was still an issue we not only revolutionized it but we shifted our talents elsewhere. On page 534 the head of texas A&M says that "therefore the cotton farmer was forced to mechanized" and what we got out of this was the cotton gin a black invention. That along with the influx of new black inventors and engineers getting pattens for their work allowed more people to actively give back to their communities and country.

Baileigh Scott said...

I like that the author shows the personal emotions and views of individual migrants in relation to the migrants as a unit. It shows how blacks were ready for change and to leave the south where they have been overlooked and mistreated for so long. "The Great Migration was the final break from an abusive union with the South," p. 538 shows that things will be looking up now that the Great Migration has taken place.

Alexis Acoff said...

I think one of the notable overall results from the great migration was that black people of this time did not accept how they were being treated and stuck together to change how this country viewed them. The great migration brought blacks together to work towards a common goal of wanting better for themselves, their children, and generations to come. They were also able to get whites on board with realizing how ridiculouis racism is and how their mistreatment towards minorities needed to be changed.

Samiya Barber said...

page 538 was the most notable for me because it showed how the blacks were finally free as stated in the quote, "It was a step in freeing not just the people who fled, but the country whose mountains they crossed."