Wednesday, December 2, 2015

The Rise: The Grit of the Arts [Pt. 2]

[The Rise]  

In the chapter on "The Grit of the Arts" from Sarah Lewis's book The Rise, what did you find more useful? Why? Please provide a page number citation.

A few selections from peers:
I thought that the definition of "grit" was the most useful. This was found on page 170, "It is not about resisting the 'hourly temptation' [...] but toiling 'over years and decades.'" This definition is useful because it paints a clear image of what giving it your all is. --Aliyah

The thing that stood out to me was on page 167, where Lewis talks about the "ongoing pattern of collapse" and how it happens because of the blind spot created by success. I think that is very important because many generations get stuck in their ways and are unwilling to re-adapt and make themselves better; they are persistent in the belief that their way is the right way, unwilling to accept the fact that their way has flaws. --J.M.

The quote that I found most meaningful from this chapter was on pages 169-170 when Lewis wrote "Grit is not just a simple elbow-grease termed for rugged persistence. It is an often invisible display of endurance that lets you stay in an uncomfortable place, work hard to improve upon a given interest, and do it again and again". I found this quote interesting because Lewis gave us a clear definition of grit, and differentiated it from persistence. --Anitra 

15 comments:

Jacqueline C. said...

One of the most useful quotes to me was on page 167, "Effective building of a bridge, of concepts, and ideas come from a form of grit that knows when development needs to give way to discovery." To me, this meant that it takes time and proper development of ideas in order to see progress and become something great in the future.

Alexandra J said...

A quote that really spoke to me was on page 169, "Grit is connected to how we respond to so-called failure, about whether we see it as a comment on our identity or merely as information that may helps improve." I think grit has a lot to do with being comfortable with being uncomfortable. We can't surpass boundaries if we stay within our comfort zone and are complacent with easy. But, we can't set the bar too high in order to fail. Grit is the balance in between and it allows us to raise our standard each time.

Natalie Thompson said...

A quote that I found more useful was " Grit is connected to how we respond to so called failure, about whether we see it as a comment on our identity or merely as information that may help us improve." (p. 169) I would consider myself a grittier cadet. I never let my failure define me. I use my failure as a learning tool to do better.

Jenee B. said...

I found it most useful when the author explains that, "Grit is a portable skill that moves across seemingly varied interests. Grit can be expressed in your chosen pursuit and appear in multiple domains over time" (pg. 179). I found this interesting because most people realize that it is usually easier to have grit in situations one chooses for themselves, but do not realize that they can maintain it even in situations they did not initially desire to be in. It is also interesting how the author described grit as something that can be trained and developed, and not only an innate personality trait.

Kayleigh E. said...

What I found most useful was on page 171 where they talk about Duckworth deciding to get a doctorate at 32 years old. She said she needs to work hard on one path consistently to accoplish anything. I am about to graduate not quite sure what I want to do, so this hits home for me. I might decide later to go back to school, but if I do, I want to make sure it is something I am passionate about. It will be difficult to make myself go back to school, but if I want to be successful I will need to.

Conradette King said...

I thought the quote on page 169 stuck out to me the most. On this page, the author writes, "Grit is connected to how we respond to so called failure, about whether we see it as a comment on our identity or merely as information that may help us improve" I really liked that quote because it sums up my attitude after a bad race. I like to think that I can heal from a bad race or competition and still have grit to keep moving forward to the next PR or first place.

Kiara G. said...

The quote that I found most useful is on page 169 and says "Grit is connected to how we respond to so called failure, about whether we see it as a comment on our identity or merely as information that may help us improve". It relates to the whole idea of failure and striving to overcome failure, which has been a common theme in the book. The quote helps to explain what motivates us to continue when we have failed and shows that either one has grit or develops it along the way in order to accomplish their goal.

Belainesh Nigeda said...

The author mentions a quote from James Watson, one of the discoverers of the DNA structure. He said, "When I was a boy, I had to reconcile the fact that I didn't have a good IQ, but I still wanted to do something important...I knew it would take grit, no question about it" (174). This quote surprised me and inspired me at the same time. I am a "science person." Sometimes, it's discouraging to be in the science classes at SIUE, where the average test scores are 67% and the teachers tell you that if you're there or even just a percent or two above, "you're doing great"...but you still end up struggling for a B or even to pass with a C. After reading that quote from Watson, who I've read about and learned from in many of my science classes, it assures me that I'm not the only one who think grit counts.

-Belainesh N.

Ashya Ford said...

I found the most value on page 167 with ,"Effective building of a bridge, of concepts, and ideas come from a form of grit that knows when development needs to give way to discovery." I think this was so profound because it ties together everything the book discusses. I think it also allows for people to understand their accomplishments and failure can be transparent.

Sierra E said...

Two thoughts really caught my attention. Much like my peer, the quote on page 169 that states, "Grit is not just a simple elbow-grease term for rugged persistence. It is an often invisible display of endurance that lets you stay in an uncomfortable place, work hard to improve upon a given interest, and do it again and again" was very powerful to me. It is a powerful statement and truth that often goes unnoticed. The second thought that captured me is found on page 182 when the author quotes Duckworth, "whatever you're doing, you have to figure out when to give out effort and when to withdraw it." This is so true. Even good things can be destructive if they are not dealt with in a healthy manner.

Mercedes H said...

A quote that I found rather significant was stated on page 173 saying, " many American kids, particularly in the last couple of decades, can feel really good about themselves without being good at anything." His stood out to me because it is very realistic and problematic. This past few generations have been taught that greatness is everyone although it may not be. This can cause mislead representation of the performance capabilities of many kids. It is not always the best idea to make someone think they are something that in fact, they are not.

Georgy N said...

The quote that caught my eye was on page 182 "whatever you're doing, you have to figure out when to give out effort and when to withdraw it." Not everything deserves 100% of effort. Putting effort into some things can be detrimental as opposed to positive. It is important to prioritize what requires you time and effort.

cassidy oliver said...

I found what can happen if one forgets to cultivate grit an amazing topic (Lewis 192). Grit is the elbow grease or the ambition that allows one to succeed. If grit is not an important aspect of life, it shows how unimportant creativity is to. Creativity runs hand and hand with grit. Without the creative grit, individuals wold lose out on life long experiences.

Quincy Sanderlin said...

I found the quote " Grit is connected to how we respond to so called failure, about whether we see it as a comment on our identity or merely as information that may help us improve", on page 169 useful. The author once again brings positive light to the definition of failure. This has been a parallel throughout her book. This quote relates to her uplifting twist on failure, by inspiring readers to see failure as the motivation to succeed. In this, your true grit is tested.

Joi M said...

I like the passage where she talks about "coping with failure to cultivate grit." This stood out to me because I've had reality checks that were much needed when I failed at something after getting other things so easily. It motivated me to change the things that caused the failure and to push harder to reach my goals.