Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Chapter 13: Transformation

[Being Wrong]

"Much of error's emotional force comes from its capacity to unsettle our idea of who we are (280). -- Kathryn Schulz

In Chapter 13 of Being Wrong, Kathryn Schulz explains, among other things, how wrongness can be viewed as "a natural and ongoing process, and we are not deformed but transformed by it" (289). She makes a strong case, really a variety of cases for the links between error and transformation. 

Of the topics Schulz addressed, in the chapter what did you find especially notable? Why? Please identify the page number for the concept or idea that you cite. 

19 comments:

Jaleelah Muhammad said...

On page 291, Schulz says," On the whole, though, being wrong when we're very young is less a series of isolated incidents...than a constant process- inextricable from learning, inextricable from growing up" Our parents often tell us that when we mess up when we are little, that it is a part of growing up. We tend not to think that about when we get older because we consider ourselves grown up not realizing that making mistakes is a part of life.

Adryan B. said...

I think the chapter on senses and how our imagination or what we encounter can cause us to make illusions out of situations. Its just amazing to see just how the human mind works and how our minds imagining or making illusions out of experiences could cause us either harm or benefit.

Brianna Reed said...

I also found the idea on page 291 the most interesting. Being wrong is a monumental part of becoming the people that we are as we continue to grow. Everyone always looks at being wrong as something bad when truthfully those are crucial teaching and learning moments when I think we are able to grow from our experiences the most. If we were always right, when would we ever learn?

Reed B.

Aliyah B. said...

I liked the explanation Schulz gave to help the reader further understand the relationship between growth and wrongness on page 289. She explained that children are wrong about many things including themselves. However, this is not because children are illogical; it is simply due their "shortage of knowledge".It was interesting because this is often why people are wrong. They are logical; however, they have not been supplied with the proper amount of knowledge to fully understand specific concepts.

Aliyah B.

Deborrah B. said...

"Whether we are reflecting on our past, contemplating our present, or predicting our future, our understanding of our self can turn out to be in error." (p.282)This sentence accurately portray many people,especially those who are in college. People can spend their whole lives trying to figure out who they are and come to realize that who they thought they were was wrong. It's extremely hard to admit that you are wrong about yourself and the things that you want to be or do. The things we do unconsciously or subconsciously can show us the parts of ourselves that we may not know exist, so that we can better understand our own minds.
Deborrah Blackburn

Anonymous said...

On page 289 the most notable quote Schulz wrote said "wrongness is a natural ans ongoing process...and we are not deformed but transformed by it". What this quote is saying is that whenever we are wrong about something, it does not destroy us but we learn and become "transformed" by the experience. This quote was so notable to me because when we make mistakes we take that memory of the mistake and use what we know happened, how we felt, and how others reacted as a way to change how we handle the situation the next time it occurs. or in some cases completely avoid it when we recognized the situation as that of a similar one.
**Brittany P.

Courtney said...

Chapter 1 on wrongology (page3) I enjoyed the idea of being wrong and it being right because everyone collectively agrees that what is wrong is right.

Anonymous said...

On page 289 Schulz wrote said "wrongness is a natural and ongoing process.." This is the quote I thought was the best. It spoke a lot to me because I never thought being wrong was a good thing. I grew I came to realize that being wrong helps you grow up And learn new things.
***Anita Jackson

Aja J said...

On page 294 Schulz says that instead of taking someone’s wrongness for ignorance , we should take it as they are just human like everyone else. I really liked this saying because I feel that it is something that everyone can relate to. Being wrong is okay and we should learn to embrace it so that we could learn from our mistakes.

Tayla Myles said...

I found page 291 to be the most interesting because it talks about how making mistakes is a learning process that everybody experiences. Being wrong is a part of everyone's lives.

Kellsey H said...

I also identified the notion presented on page 291 as the most notable. I feel as being wrong is essential to developing our character and identities as human beings. It is the responses that we have to our mistakes that shape us into who we truly are.

Alexandra D. said...

The most notable quote is "wrongness is a natural and ongoing process, and we are not deformed but transformed by it" (289). Being wrong is a process to help us grow and not to break us. When we look at like that we can begin to accept our wrongs and become better individuals.

Fiona H. said...

On page 290, Schulz says, "Wrongness is a natural and ongoing process..and we are not deformed but transformed by it." This is the most 'notable' quote to me because it is the most relatable and relevant quote to me. The quote basically says that being wrong is okay; our lives are not over because we are wrong. We grow and learn from being wrong. We tend to think being wrong and making mistakes is the end of the world, but its not; we learn lessons in our wrongness.

Sydney J said...

On page 291, Schulz talks about how being wrong is simply a part of growing up. Everyone always seems so against the idea that they might actually be wrong. But, I think you just need to learn from your mistakes and accept the fact that you are wrong.
Sydney J.

Anonymous said...

The thing that stuck with me the most was when Shultz says, “we don’t know ourselves well enough, or remain static for long enough, to consistently come up with the right answer”(282). She is referring to shopping but I think that it can be applied to other areas of our daily lives as well.
-Taylor M.

Jaiara Johnson said...

Chapter 1, Page 7. Shultz says that as a culture, we need to be right and haven't come to terms with being wrong. We are so right in our minds that we deny the thought of ever being wrong in the first place.
Jaiara Johnson

Breanna B said...

I actually found Schulz discussion of how being wrong is important in our personal growth. Just like Brianna said, we often have a negative idea of being wrong--like it's forbidden. But without being wrong, being right would mean nothing, and once again like Brianna said, how would we ever learn?

Lindsey McCall said...

On pages 290-291 Schulz discusses how children are taught wrongness and how they eventually learn the truth with age. This was quite notable to me because maybe we are all comfortable with being wrong and being set in our ways because from birth we were taught that. We would go toe to toe with someone who tried to tell us Santa Claus isn't real and as adults we will go toe to toe with someone who challenges our beliefs.

DuAuna C. said...

The ending on page 293 to the beginning of page 294 is what I found most notable. In this section was mentioned how we shouldn't judge people off of their wrongness and look at it as ignorance but instead we should do the opposite, and remember that we we are all human. I believe that if most of us lived by this it could help everyone else. It's very relatable because just about everyone has been judged based off of their wrongness and many people have judged others for the same reason.