Wednesday, February 18, 2015

On Being Wrong, Chapter 4: Our Minds, Part One

[Being Wrong]

"Wrongness knows no limits...there is no form of knowledge, however central or unassailable it may seem, that cannot, under certain circumstances, fail us" (69). --Kathryn Schulz

In chapter 4 "Our Minds," in her book Being Wrong, Kathryn Schulz discusses how seemingly accurate memories of events end up being inaccurate. Over time, our memories can become "riddled with errors" yet continue "to feel so right" (73). She later points out that "we are bad knowing we don't know," and most of us "are noticeably better at generating theories than registering our own ignorance" (82-83).

After reading Schulz's chapter, what's one specific way you now view the accuracy or inaccuracy of your memory? Or, how did the chapter influence your view concerning the limits of your knowledge?

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

This chapter influenced me in my way of understanding how our limits of our knowledge can "blind" us. When we are not aware of something, we refute anyone who tries to prove us wrong. I think this plays into our psychological self and how we choose to be "blind" to certain things.
****Brittany Perry

Jaleelah Muhammad said...

I now view the inaccuracy of my memory as something comical. I will sear up and down that whatever i thought i remembered to be true only to find out that it wasn't. It would suck to feel wrong about it.

Terri McFadden said...

This argument or fact keeps coming up. In Psychology, we just learned that no one actually has memories from the time they are born til the time they are 3 years old. I remember arguing with my best friend about this a year ago because I swore I remembered events that my sisters often talked about. Schulz, sadly, gave me a more detailed reason why. I completely agree with her and I think it's intriguing in a good way because even if we don't think we are creative or have imagination, this proves that we all do.

Aja J said...

After reading this chapter, I think that it is very interesting that our own memories end up being inaccurate. I definitely think that we take pleasure is being right and not making errors. In reality, not knowing certain things is common and should not deter anyone from trying to prove their point.

Tayla Myles said...

After reading chapter 4, it now makes sense of why certain things do not seem complete when I try to retell a story. It makes sense, but everybody does it so I don't feel bad about it.

Brianna Reed said...

Personally, I hate being told that something I felt I remember perfectly is actually a skewed version of the reality. I am often told I recall things incorrectly and myself, being stubborn, will argue to no end that I am correct. Reading this chapter made me more aware of the fact that I actually do that. It's amazing how our will to want something to be a certain way will actually make us edit our own thoughts and memories to achieve it even if it means being blind to the truth.

Tayla Myles said...

After reading chapter 4, I now understand the inaccuracy of my memory. Sometimes I'd try to tell a story and it wouldn't be the exact same version as the other person who was also there. But I do not feel bad about it because everyone does it.

Tashawna Nash said...

This chapter influenced my view concerning the limits of my knowledge by giving a more detailed explanation in how Schulz talks about how through knowledge it gives up more conviction of rightness. This is particularly true because when we think we know something we will stick to what we say and/or believe whether we are right or wrong until we are proved wrong.
~Tashawna Nash

Taylor Morgan said...

I thought it was so interesting that someone could not know that they didn't know something. This is why it can be hard to correct someone. They might not believe what you say against what they already have an understanding of.

Alicia Sears said...

This chapter influenced me because I know can think about this whenever I am recalling an event about something I thought I remembered when I actually dont. Instead of arguing with someone who has a different view as me I can just agreee to disagree.

Jaiara Johnson said...

Memorys can be very inaccurate. I feel that the mind makes us believe things that didn't happen because maybe we want to try to forget a bad memory and replace it with a good one. The mind is great at that.
-Jaiara Johnsom

Anonymous said...

This chapter influenced me in the way that are knowledge is not that vast. Yes some of us claim to have great memory while others do not. While in reality we all seem to be having the same problem. I understand now that when I believe I remember everything and obviously I do not.
**** Anita Jackson

cassidy oliver said...

I think the chapter just reinforced the idea that intelligence has no limits. That could be the reason why we humans have excelled in ways such as math and science. But memory uses a whole different aspect of the brain that does have a capacity. As we start to form new memories, and the older one age, the memories become distorted into something that is different from the original experience.I think this chapter also points out natural human flaws that can lead us to believe our ignorance is something that it is not. The mind can basically play tricks and when we are not aware, we can succumb to them, whether the effects are positive or negative.

cassidy oliver said...

I personally do not view my memory as being inaccurate or accurate. However my memory has been distorted is for a reason and has to be the way I would like to remember it. Since the memory is undeniably inaccurate, that is why our memories should not always be used as a way to qualify statements. The inaccuracy in memory also puts a hole in the current justice system we have involving witnesses. With multiple concepts that relies on memory instead of factual information, it makes you wonder how accurate the pedagogues and paradigms we rely on are.

Anonymous said...

I do not feel badly about the inaccuracy of my memory after reading this chapter because I feel that it is very true and figured it because I get my dreams confused with reality every once in a while. This is only because my dreams be so accurate and realistic that I actually believe them and at times have argued with people because I was for sure that what I had dreamed actually happened in real life just to find out that I was wrong.
Sierra Lucas