Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Chapter 17 “A School, A Hospital, a Cricket Field”

[Behind the Beautiful Forevers]

In chapter 17 “A School, A Hospital, a Cricket Field” of Behind the Beautiful Forevers, Annawadians receive notice that all the slums near the airport are going to be demolished. The Husain family finds some relief after Karam and Kahkashan are found not guilty in the Fatima trial although Abdul’s case continues to be held up in juvenile court.

Boo writes “The Beautiful Forever wall came down, and in two days, the sewage lake that had brought dengue fever and malaria to the slum was filled in, its expanse leveled in preparation for some new development. The slumdwellers consoled one another, ‘It’s not at us yet, just at the edges.’ The demolition of airport slums would occur in phases over several years, so there was still plenty of time for the residents to unite to ensure that the businessmen and politicians who’d been buying up huts wouldn’t be the only beneficiaries of the promised rehabilitation” (383-384).

What idea from chapter 17 fascinated you most? Why or how so? Provide page citation please.

--Kacee Aldridge

9 comments:

Jacquelene G said...

The most interesting part from chapter 17 to me was the difference in the Annawandian classes and how that affected their perspective. This is seen on page 389. The text mentions the fact that, “Poor people didn’t unite; they competed ferociously amongst themselves…the gates of the rich occasionally rattled, remained unbreached”. It caught my eye because you would think that the poor Annawandians would sympathize with each other and help each other to get ahead, but instead they were competing with one another through scavenging and other means of getting money. They were staying in the same spot struggling while the rich were helping each other to get more and more wealthy.

Jac`quelene G.

Jacqueline C. said...

The idea that fascinated me the most was that it said, " Poor people didn't unite; they competed ferociously amongst themselves for gains as slender as they were provisional." (389). You would think the people less fortunate in society would work together to get their voices heard and make a difference in their country. Instead, they tear each other down and don't allow themselves to become successful and have purpose in society.

Sandra N said...

There are two quotes in this chapter that are interesting to me. First was the last pargraph on page 388 "Instead, powerless individuals blamed other powerless individuals for what they lacked...by beggaring the life chances of other poor people." The other one goes along that. Page 389 "Poor people don't unite; they compete ferociously amongs each other for gains as slender as they were provisional." In a way the manner in which the rich and the poor interact with each other makes sense. The rich mostly got that way by learning to use the people around them to get what they want. They know the value of networking and helping those around you so they will later help you when you need it. The poor are so busy trying to get money they step on those around them mot realizing that will hurt them in the long run. People like Asha have no problem using and abusing the people she sees are beneath her even though they are the reason she is making money. By not helping each other, the poor people of Annawadi are helping to keep themselves in poverty.

Anonymous said...

What fascinated me was this passage from the book: "Annawandian boys broadly accepted the basic truths that in a modernizing world...city, their lives were embarrassments best confined to small spaces, and their deaths would not matter at all". I have written about this previously, how life circumstances have forced these children to grow up. It shows such a contrast to children from our country who are not made to think like this. This thinking also illustrates how indifferent the upper class is to the lower class, uncaring and unconcerned with their lives.

Marta A.

Kayleigh E. said...

The part of chapter 17 that fascinated me most was on page 387. Two horses died and made the news and got the attention of animal rights activists. There was justice brought to the owner for animal cruelty. On page 387 it talks about how the boys would die and their deaths would mean nothing, yet two horses died and their deaths caused so much attention. The horses got justice, but humans cannot.

Jenee B. said...

One of the most fascinating parts of Ch. 17 was on pg. 386, when the public was extremely concerned about the neglect and treatment of the horses, but did not care at all about the condition of the poor in Annawadi. It was saddening that most of the people in Annawadi were not surprised and understood that they were just seen as an embarrassment. I thought it was ridiculous that people would more quickly help animals than their fellow human beings who were probably in much worse conditions than the animals. However, it opened my eyes even more to how much the poor are ignored.

Candace P said...

The idea from Chapter 17 that fascinated me the most was the belief that "At Annawadi, everyone had a wrong he wanted righted...But the slumdwellers rarely got mad together-not even about the airport authority" (388). Many readers or individuals of higher-class would undoubtedly think that people in these circumstances would join together and attempt to get those wrongs fixed as a society. However when one is in these circumstances, he/she may just want someone to plan for the injustice that he/she receives.

Ashya Ford said...

The anger within the town is what fascinated me; to some degree, it was expected though. On page 388, it says "powerless individuals blamed other powerless individuals for what they lacked." I found this ideology of interest because it is such a crippling mindset, yet it's the first one many people jump to in a difficult situation or one that they cannot agree with. It was amazing that at this stage there was still much division amongst those going through the same things.
Ashya F.

Kiara Gay said...

On page 387 it talks about how justice was brought about for the lives of horses who were treated poorly by their owner, and malnourished so their owner was punished. It also say, "Annawadi boys broadly accepted the basic truths: that in a modernizing, increasingly prosperous city, their lives were embarrassments best confined to small spaces, and their deaths would matter not at all". It really blew my mind that in this society the lives of horses were more worthy and special than the lives of other beings. What really drew me to this part of the chapter was that I feel as though I can relate this to real life. People will defend the lives of animals before they work together to help the lives of beings that are like themselves prosper in this world.