Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Chapter 16: "Black and White"

[Behind the Beautiful Forevers]

In chapter 16 “Black and White” of Behind the Beautiful Forevers, Katherine Boo highlights many of Asha’s business ventures and other responsibilities in Annawadi. With the parliamentary elections impending, many Annawadians are hopeful about the election as it was their chance to be a legitimate part of the state.

Boo writes “Of course it’s corrupt, Asha told the deferential new secretary of the nonprofit. But is it my corruption? How can anyone say I am doing the wrong when the big people did all the papers – when the big people say that it’s right?” (376).

What did you find most notable about Asha’s rationalization about corruption? Why?

--Kacee Aldridge  

12 comments:

Mercedes H said...

What I found most notable about Asha's realization about corruption was the fact that she blamed her wrongs doings on someone else. She thought that in the end she should not be blamed for doing wrong because she wasn't in charge and she was told it was right. Despite her knowledge of the situation, Asha is trying to gain from this situation and no one's opinion will change that. I find it pitiful that she has to lie and cheat to feel better as a whole and it is even more upsetting that she would not face the music when it all falls down.

Shervonti Norman said...

Asha is an interesting character to me overall. She has one strong personality and she is very driven but she is not honest in what she does. This rationalization about corruption just furthers the dishonesty. She's acknowledged that what she is doing is corrupt but won't take the blame for it since the people "above" her are who created the corruption. In the grand scheme of things, she would be the one actually put at fault because she is the direct source but I'm sure she'd try to deny that to no end.

I guess what I find most notable is that she's attempting to be oblivious to what is going on but that's completely impossible. She knows what she is doing is not right but she will continue to do it because it's putting her ahead of everyone else and helping her accomplish her materialistic goals.

Brianna B said...

I think that the worst part of this rationalization would be that she didn't care that it was wrong just that she didn't feel like the people who taught her what she is supposed to do is corrupt should change, but that opinions on corruption should change because that is what the people in charge are doing.

Jessica Oranika said...

What I found most notable about Asha's rationalization about corruption was the fact that she felt almost superior to the other slumdwellers because she was using the corruption to her advantage. You would think that living in the slums and seeing the way things are would make her want to help others.

Andrea R. said...

I had to read the quote a few times but what stuck out to me is that she in a way, shifts all of the blame from herself and onto others. If I recall correctly, Asha wanted to attain a position of power within the slums by any means necessary in a sense. To me this quote harkens back to that initial introduction of her character.

Anitra B. said...

What I found most notable about Asha's realization is that she doesn't want to be held accountable for her actions. She tries to play it off as if she did nothing wrong because she wasn't the one to start the corruption, it was the people above her. It's sad because she knew what she doing was wrong and continued to do it as long as she gained from it, but when it came to light she claims to be unaware of her wrongdoings.

Sierra Ewing said...

I think that her rationalization is a very manipulative and passive reaction. It seems as though she is reaping every benefit of the corruption and none of the consequences. I find it disheartening and dishonest but it goes to show that corruption appears in several forms and visibilities. Corruption is always present, fault may or may not be placed on those belonging.

Conradette King said...

I found Asha's rationalization about corruption to be puzzling and frightening. She is so quick to put the blame on the others instead of herself. She is as much to blame for the corrupt government as anyone else who works for the council. I find that frightening when someone can totally seperate themselves from the bad things they are doing without feeling any type of guilt.

Natalie Thompson said...

The thing that I found most notable is the fact that she is so oblivious to the fact that shes parts of the schemes. She reminds me of someone who like to throw stones and hide her hands. Regardless of who did what wring is wrong and I thinks she knows its wrong but she wants to stay in the position she is in and do whatever it takes to make sure she is like by the higher ups. She doesn't care who she has to step on and hurt as long as it doesn't directly affect her.

Joi M said...

I also find the most notable thing about the rationalization is that she tried to pass the blame. No matter how crooked the character, one can respect someone who is consistent & owns up to their wrong doings. I feel that it is still somewhat respectable even if the person doesn't feel bad for the things they've done. However, her passing the blame is the most notable because it shows her true character. She's not someone who truly believes in the things she's done, but she is simply someone who uses whatever situation she is in it to her advantage until she can no longer do so.

Kiana S. said...

I think the most notable thing about Asha's rationalization of corruption is that she thinks it is what will get her ahead. She believes all of this corruption is normal because that's what she sees. She believes that this is the way to becoming a successful person in her community. I honestly believe that she is influenced by her surroundings, whether it's right or wrong.

Belainesh Nigeda said...

I can understand Asha's rationale for not taking full responsibility for her actions. I think she justifies her actions because this is a job being given to her and as a result, this is money given to her. It may be wrong, but with the way their society is going, she does seem like she is the only one improving her quality of life (financially). In her mind, it appears to be money over morale.
-B.Nigeda