Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Chapter 8

[Behind the Beautiful Forevers]

In chapter 8 “The Master” of Behind the Beautiful Forevers, Katherine Boo describes the experiences of Karam, Abdul, and Kehkashan, all three in jail accused of Fatima’s murder. Zehrunisa, struggling to care for her other children goes to great lengths to help her family, even bribing a local school to produce documentation that Abdul is a minor which results in him being sent to a juvenile detention center instead of the dreaded Arthur Road Jail with his father.

Regarding Abdul, Boo notes that “He wouldn’t admit to something he hadn’t done to Fatima, even if it would get him out of Dongri, even if his family’s income suffered in his absence. To his family, Abdul’s physical capability had been the mattering thing. He was the workhorse, his moral judgments irrelevant. But when The Master spoke of tufeez and izzat, respectability and honor, Abdul thought the man’s stare had been blazed on him alone. It was not too late, at seventeen or whatever age he was, to resist the corrupting influences of his world and his nature” (230-231).

What do you find most notable about the corruption and constant bribery presented in reading? Why?

14 comments:

Kiana S. said...

I think the most notable thing about the corruption and bribery is that it is so prevalent in people's every day lives. It's not only the upper and middle-class people, it is the lower-class people as well. Boo makes it seem like it is the only way to survive in these communities.

Brianna B said...

I think, as i've been saying, that the most notable thing about corruption in this reading is how no one seems to have any qualms about it. No one objects to it, this corruption is so deeply embedded in the lives of these people that they are not surprised or even disturbed when it happens.

Jessica Oranika said...

What I found most notable about the corruption is the acceptance that people had for it. There was no Channel 5 news to call and tell your story to. There was no manager or corporate office to call and there was no higher power to come and help. These people had no one to protect them in the name of fairness so they just accepted it and tried to make the best of the corrupt deals.

Conradette King said...

What I find most notable about the corruption and bribery in the book is the abundance of corruption allowed to happen in the slum. The people are used to the corruption that they it has become their norm. No one blinks an eye when they see illegal actions going on in their community and that is what I find most bizarre about the book.

Sierra Ewing said...

I find it interesting that corruption is so commonplace. Like breathing is to each of us, so violence and bribery and dishonesty is to some cultures. It is something that the people have become accustomed to and accepted. There is no way to foresee a change in that reality, either. It is like a part of them.

Alex J said...

This chapter really allows you to see how different certain societies are. In this chapter, we see how normal corruption has become. Bribery and corruption have become so normal that the people keep allowing it to happen and don't do anything about it. Although they did try and make the best of their situation, there is yet to be an individual who realizes how wrong this is and that something should be done.

Natalie Thompson said...

What I find notable about the corruption is that it seems that its everyday life for these people and its all about the money. When Abdul was getting his exam at the doctor's office, I found it strange how the doctor asked him for 2,000 rupees in order to falsify Abdul's age. It seems like money is everything to these people. I guess they feel these people are sometimes desperate and will pay anything in order to survive and the people who have the power are taking advantage of the situations. It seems like doing the right thing and trying to live the right way will no get you far in this small town. I remember Zehrunisa saying that if she would have just paid the rupees to the police then none of this would have even happened. I feel so sorry for their family.

Andrea R. said...

The most notable thing about the corruption and bribery is, as others have mentioned, it's become so ingrained in their every day life that it's almost become normal. It's unlike the corruption that goes on in first world countries like the US where the only ones truly benefiting from bribery and such things are people in positions of power and the upper-class. Instead everyone seems to take advantage of it regardless of class.

Shervonti Norman said...

I feel that the most notable aspect about the corruption and constant bribery in this reading is that it effects everyone's everyday life. Basically, this is how everyone has to live their lives. If they want to get anyway they have to be okay with corruption and bribery. I'd like to think that maybe they don't know any better but as the story continues, it's notable that these people know this is the only way they really have a chance.

Mercedes H said...

I believe that the most notable thing in regards to corruption and constant bribery is the fact that it is so prominent to every aspect of Indian life. There is so much bribery that is consumes and determines the role a life will play out. What is more notable it the fact that they all give in and enable it to continue.

Anitra B. said...

I think that the most notable thing about the corruption and bribery is that it is portrayed as a norm in this society. It also seems like it's necessary to survive and almost everyone is involved in it. Even the professions that are looked up to, the doctor and police in the last reading, are also participating in the corruption and bribery.

Breanna B. said...

Corruption is a major theme in the novel. It clearly dictates the lives of all the societal levels. What I find slightly disturbing is the lack of acknowledgement towards the corruption.

Joi M said...

I think the craziest thing about he corruption is that it is so obvious. Living in America we think that things like corruption are kept secret or don't happen all that often, but in this book it amazes me how not only is it known, but it happens to a lot of people. It's just hard to wrap one's mind around how it must be living in a community where there's so much "sketchiness" going on.

Belainesh Nigeda said...

I don't think that the society of the Annawadians are much different when it comes to money. They are corrupt in the same way that we are corrupt. Money is everything to people and an exception can always be made if you're offering enough of it.
-B. Nigeda