Wednesday, February 26, 2014

AR-EN: Selves & Selfies

[A Notebook on Alyssa Rosenberg & Emily Nussbaum]    

In her article “Selfies, Instagram Videos, and Why Posted Images Are As Revealing As Candids,” Alyssa Rosenberg writes that unlike unexpected images, “an image that a subject has participated in creating can tell us all of those things and how the subject wants to be seen.” What were you inclined to think or reconsider regarding selfies as a result of reading Rosenberg’s essay? Why or how so?

8 comments:

Jessica Oranika said...

Rosenberg's essay made me reconsider the authenticity of Instagram personas. Many peoples lives can be glamourized on social networks. Scrolling through a persons Instagram page it's clear which feature, angle, pose or face they believe to be their best. I agree with Rosenberg's claim that selfies can reveal our insecurities.

Brenda W said...

"There’s a reason the photos we take of ourselves are so different than those taken by others". This line truly stood out to me in the article and made me think of what that really means. I have an instagram account and I am guilty of the selfie trend and capturing moments the way I want them remembered; but I never viewed how participating in how pictures are captured truly impacts the reality of that memory or situation. On several occasions, I have taken a picture to hide that pimple or "capture my good side". When others take pictures of me, I do not have that ability to control what is seen. That is the beauty of reality; I feel I should not control how my picture comes out because that distorts the image of who I really am. Selfies are almost like an avatar that individuals can use to hide their flaws. With filters, Photoshop, and many other tools; pictures and social media these days are just becoming a platform for unrealistic personae and expectations. If individuals in the real world are not flawless, why should our pictures be?

Candace P said...

After reading Rosenberg's article regarding selfies and Instagram videos, I was reminded of how much time I spend editing my pictures and videos in order to get the "perfect" image. Although I am guilty of editing my own creations in order to be seen a certain way, however, I am still revealing authentic details about my life. It is impossible to hide everything about yourself just by using Photoshop or picture filters- a flaw is eventually going to emerge. As Rosenberg states, "Just because someone wants to conceal or to highlight certain facets of their physical person, or their personality doesn’t mean that they’re succeeding."

Conradette King said...

The article made me realize that people aren't as glamorous as they make themselves appear on social networks. I dont have an instagram but I do have a twitter, and I am not a big fan of people taking pictures of me. When a person takes a "selfie" they make sure that they are as perfect as they can be. You have filters, lighting, and other things to make you look the way you want to be seen in public.

Georgy N said...

Although Rao is right about Instagram being for the entertaining moments in our lives, I don't agree that it emphasize our insecurities. I think selfies do the opposite of that. Some people do post pictures to get attention. Most people would not want to be judged so physically. I think the increase in selfies shows a slight increase in the confidence that people have. Rosenberg is correct in saying that selfies show the way the subject wants to be portrayed.

Ajeenah Johnson-Brown said...

Unlike many of my peers, I myself do not have an instagram. However, I have been a witness to the selfie trend. I see my friends take multiple pictures of themselves just trying to get the "perfect shot". Not only instagram, but the internet and our mobile devices have allowed us to all become photo editors. You can change the shade of the photo to make yourself look lighter and enhance certain parts of the picture. These pictures allow us to choose how the world sees us, and often times thanks to instagram the world does not see the real us.

Ashley Bass said...

Rosenberg's article regarding selfies made me think of my photos and everyone else's photos on Instagram. I already know that people always post their best or cutest pictures on Instagram, but I never really thought about how the photos can reveal people's insecurities. As I was scrolling through people's Instagram pages, I saw all the beautifully taken photos, but I was also able to point out some people's insecurities as well. One girl never takes close up pictures smiling, so she may be insecure about her smile. Another female only takes head shots so she may be insecure about her body. I never really looked at people's photos and saw their insecurities, I only saw what they liked about themselves, but after reading this article I can point out what people are insecure about by how they take their pictures.

Tia S. said...

I don't have an Instagram, but what Rosenberg said makes sense, "Instagram isn’t about reality – it’s about a well-crafted fantasy." Social media is about picking the side of yourself that you want to show (whether it's a real side of you or not) and really playing up the positives. People don't just put up any photo. They pick the photo that portrays the idea they want to be shown. There can be a lot of consideration in terms of editing a photo or getting the pose just right because it has to be "perfect" (or close to it). I don't think people post photos with the intention of making themselves look bad, it's all about the glamour and looking good.